Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Events with over 600+ Conferences, 1200+ Symposiums and 1200+ Workshops on Medical, Pharma, Engineering, Science, Technology and Business.

Explore and learn more about Conferenceseries Ltd: World’s leading Event Organizer

Conference Series Conferences gaining more Readers and Visitors

Conference Series Web Metrics at a Glance

  • 3000+ Global Events
  • 25 Million+ Visitors
  • 25000+ unique visitors per conference
  • 70000+ page views for every individual conference

Unique Opportunity! Online visibility to the Speakers and Experts

Food & Nutrition 2017

Governors Recognition

About Conference

ConferenceSeries Ltd invites all the participants from all over the world to attend Food & Nutrition conference during May 22-24, 2017 at Las Vegas, Nevada, USA which includes prompt Keynote Presentations, Oral talks, Poster Presentations Young Research Forum and Exhibitions.

Food & Nutrition Conference is the premier event that brings together a unique and international mix of experts, researchers and decision makers both from academia and industry across the globe to exchange their knowledge, expertise and research innovations to Food & Nutrition.

The event focuses on aspects such as Food Safety management system, Food nanotechnology, Food microbiology, Food storage, preservation & packaging, Food toxicology, Food fraud: detection and prevention, Nutrition, Nutraceuticals & nutrition supplements, Malnutrition & Under-nutrition, Lipid science & Technology, Nutrients & Nutrition Science, Dieticians & Nutritionists, Probiotic, Functional & baby food. ConferenceSeries Ltd organizes 1000+ Global Events inclusive of 600 Conferences, 1200+ Upcoming and Previous Symposiums and Workshops in USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific societies and publishes 750+ Open access journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Food & Nutrition conference invites a common platform for Deans, Directors, Professors, Students, Research scholars and other participants including CEO, Consultant, Head of Management, Economist, and Project Manager from business and industrial sectors across the world in order to establish a scientific relation between academic experts and other participants through information sharing and networking. Experts around the globe are going to meet in one platform Food & Nutrition conference to introduce advance technologies and recent scientific explorations as well as future of Food and allied fields. Eminent speakers from all around the world are going to be united to introduce the most advance researches and technologies in Food & Nutrition and other related fields. Food & Nutrition also enables a chance to conduct a workshop, symposium and exhibition to emerge new possibilities in the Food Manufacturing fields and other related sectors of Food & Nutrition. This conference will provide the sponsors for practical demonstration, product promotion and making a connection with eminent persons and other customers to receive new business line for future marketing. By this conference, people can share their views and ideas and can improve their knowledge about the advanced techniques to increase the productivity of the industries. This is an open event, we welcome and invite you to participate in this prestigious Food & Nutrition conference  to make event as the best event in Las Vegas, USA.

Session & Tracks

17th International Conference on Food & Nutrition to be held during May 22-24, 2017 at Las Vegas, USA. The prestigious International Conference on Food & Nutrition to address latest innovations, industrial & modern technologies in food & Nutrition, and differentiation in market report. Food & Nutrition 2017 is the premier event that brings together a unique international mixture of experts, researchers and decision makers both from academia and industry across the globe to exchange their knowledge, experience and research innovations to build a better world of Food & Nutrition. 

Track 1:- Food

Food is made up of nutrients. Micronutrients such as vitamins and minerals are needed only in small amounts. Macronutrients such as carbohydrates, protein and fat are needed in larger amounts. The body cannot function properly if one or more nutrients are missing. A healthy and balanced diet provides foods in the right amounts and combinations that are safe and free from disease and harmful substances Prevention is better than cure. The earlier a person starts to eat a healthy and balanced diet, the more he or she will stay healthy. Once weight has been lost it may be difficult to regain it because of tiredness and lack of appetite.

Related Conferences on Food

18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July 24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2nd International Conference on Food Microbiology November 09-11, 2017 Madrid, Spain; 16th World Congress on Nutrition September 18-20, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; 9th World Nutrition & Health Congress February 20-21, 2017 Berlin, Germany; 11th World Congress on Nutrition and Food Sciences May 29-31, 2017 Osaka, Japan; 11th International Conference on Molecular Nutrition & Dietetics June 12-14, 2017 Rome, Italy.

Related society on food

National Association of Citrus Juice Processors, USA; American Cheese Society, USA; The Association of Food Technology, Turkey; European Food Safety Authority, Italy; Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Canada; Association of Food Science and Technology of Basque Country, Spain; Institute of Food Technologists, USA; International Wine & Food Society,  UK.

Track 2:- Food Safety Management System (FSMS)

A Food Safety Management System (FSMS) is a network of interrelated elements that combine to ensure that food does not cause adverse human health effects. These elements include programs, plans, policies, procedures, practices, processes, goals, objectives, methods, controls, roles, responsibilities, relationships, documents, records, and resources.

Related Conferences on Food Safety Management System

18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference  on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July 24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2nd International Conference on Food Microbiology November 09-11, 2017 Madrid, Spain; 16th World Congress on Nutrition September 18-20, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; 9th World Nutrition & Health Congress February 20-21, 2017 Berlin, Germany; 11th World Congress on Nutrition and Food Sciences May 29-31, 2017 Osaka, Japan; 11th International Conference on Molecular Nutrition & Dietetics June 12-14, 2017 Rome, Italy.

Related society on food safety management system

Asian Food Safety and Security Association, Japan; Australian Institute of Food Science and Technology, Australia; European Food Information Resource, Belgium; European Food Safety Authority, Italy; Institute of Food Technologists.

 Track 3:-Food Nanotechnology

Nanotechnology can be defined as the design, characterisation, production and application of structures, devices and systems by controlling shape and size at the nanometre scale. It covers a very wide range of activities, so it is probably more correct to refer to 'nanotechnologies’. Nanomaterial have been defined by the Royal Society as having one dimension less than 100 nanometres, but this is not a rigid definition and may change as the science evolves. There is increasing interest in the nanoscale because properties of such materials can be very different from those at the larger scale, and potentially very useful. This can be because materials have a  relatively larger surface area, which can make them more chemically reactive. Materials at this scale can also have different optical, electrical or magnetic behaviour. The types of material produced can be at the nanoscale in one dimension (very thin coatings), two dimensions (nanowires and nanotubes) or three dimensions (nanoparticles, such as very fine powder preparations). Nanotechnologies are not new – chemists have been making polymers based on nanoscale sub-units for many years and we are also exposed to nanoparticles in daily life (such as from vehicular exhaust emissions).In their widest sense, nanotechnology and nanomaterial’s are a natural part of food processing and conventional foods, because the characteristic properties of many foods rely on nanometre sized components (such as Nano emulsions and foams). However, recent technological developments lead the way for manufactured nanoparticles to be added to food. These could be finely divided forms of existing ingredients, or completely novel chemical structures.

Related Conferences on Food Nanotechnology

18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food  Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July 24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2nd International Conference on Food Microbiology November 09-11, 2017  Madrid, Spain; 16th World Congress on Nutrition September 18-20, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; 9th World Nutrition & Health Congress February 20-21, 2017 Berlin, Germany; 11th World Congress on Nutrition and Food Sciences May 29-31, 2017 Osaka, Japan; 11th International Conference on Molecular Nutrition & Dietetics June 12-14, 2017 Rome, Italy.

Related society on Nanotechnology

Canadian Cattlemen's AssociationCanada; Canadian Restaurant and Foodservices Association, Canada; Food and Drink Federation, USA; New South Wales Food Authority, UK; American Dairy Products Institute, USA National Frozen Food Association, USA; Institute of Food Technologists, UK; International Association of Food Industry Suppliers, USA; International Bottled Water Association, USA.

Track 4:-Food Microbiology

Bacteria are the most important microorganisms to the food processor. Most are harmless, many are highly beneficial, some indicate the probable presence of filth, disease organisms, spoilage and a few cause disease. There are thousands of species of bacteria, but all are single-celled and fall into three basic shapes: spherical, straight rods, and spiral rods. To see them, you need a microscope that magnifies about 1000-fold. All bacteria reproduce by dividing into two cells. The two cells then divide to become 4, 4 become 8, and so forth. Under ideal conditions, this doubling may occur as frequently as every 15 minutes, so that within 5 hours there will be more than a million cells from the original single cell. If there are 1000 original cells instead of a single one, there will be over 1 billion cells in 5 hours Some rod-shaped bacteria are capable of existing in two forms, dormant spores and active vegetative cells. Vegetative cells form spores under adverse conditions as a means of survival. Spore forms preserve the bacteria from starvation, drying, freezing, chemicals, and heat. When conditions become favourable, the spores germinate, with each spore again becoming a vegetative cell with the ability to reproduce. Among the bacteria, sporulation is not a means of reproduction since each cell forms a single spore which later germinates into a single cell again. Most sporulating bacteria that grow in the presence of air belong to the Genus Bacillus, and most that grow only in the absence of air belong to the Genus Clostridium.

Related Conferences on Food Microbiology

18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July 24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2nd International Conference on Food Microbiology November 09-11, 2017  Madrid, Spain; 16th World Congress on Nutrition September 18-20, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; 9th World Nutrition & Health Congress February 20-21, 2017 Berlin, Germany; 11th World Congress on Nutrition and Food Sciences May 29-31, 2017 Osaka, Japan; 11th International Conference on Molecular Nutrition & Dietetics June 12-14, 2017 Rome, Italy.

Related society on food microbiology

 Produce Marketing Association, USA; Scotland Food & Drink, Scotland; Scotty Brand Ltd, Scotland; Southern Hemisphere Association of Fresh Fruit Exporters, USA; Specialty Coffee Association of Indonesia, Indonesia; Specialty Food Association, USA; Specialty Wine Retailers Association, USA.

 Track 5:-Food Storage, Preservation & Packaging

The term food preservation refers to any one of a number of techniques used to prevent food from spoiling. It includes methods such as canning, pickling, drying and freeze-drying, irradiation, pasteurization, smoking, and the addition of chemical additives. Food preservation has become an  increasingly important component of the food industry as fewer people eat foods produced on their own lands, and as consumers expect to be able to purchase and consume foods that are out of season. Dairy foods are also using forms of advanced packaging technologies to enhance shelf life. Ryan Foods, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Dean Foods that produces extended shelf life (ESL) fluid milk products, uses ESL processing and packaging to push back their "best before" dates. ESL processing and packaging employs ultra-high temperature (UHT) pasteurization.

Related Conferences on Food Storage, preservation & Packaging

18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July 24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2nd International Conference on Food Microbiology November 09-11, 2017 Madrid, Spain; 16th World Congress on Nutrition September 18-20, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; 9th World Nutrition & Health Congress February 20-21, 2017 Berlin, Germany; 11th World Congress on Nutrition and Food Sciences May 29-31, 2017 Osaka, Japan; 11th International Conference on Molecular Nutrition & Dietetics June 12-14, 2017 Rome, Italy.

 Related society on food storage, reservation and packaging

Microbiological Safety of Food Funders Group (FSA) UK, Institute of Food Research, United Kingdom, Health Department of the Generalitat de Catalunya Spain, Norwegian Food Safety Authority Norway, Ministry of Economic Affairs Agriculture and Innovation Netherlands, Federal Ministry of Food Agriculture and Consumer Protection, Germany, Food Pack Expo September 22-24, 2016 Las Vegas, USA, 7th International Conference on Food Engineering and Biotechnology - ICFEB Singapore, 12th March, 2016; 3rd International Conference on Food Security and Nutrition - ICFSN Amsterdam, Netherlands, 23rd March, 2016; 2nd International Conference on Food and Agricultural Engineering (ICFAE 2016) Copenhagen, Denmark, 11th May, 2016; Agriculture and Food 2016, 4th International Conference Elenite, Bulgaria, 20th June, 2016.

Track 6:-Food Toxicology

Food Toxicology is involved in delivering a safe and edible supply of food to the consumer. During processing, a number of substances may be added to food to make it look, taste, or smell better. Fats, oils, sugars, starches and other substances may be added to change the texture and taste of food. All of these additives are studied to determine if and at what amount, they may produce adverse effects. A second area of interest includes food allergies. Almost 30% of the American people have some food allergy. For example, many people have trouble digesting milk, and are lactose intolerant. In addition, toxic substances such as pesticides may be applied to a food crop in the field, while lead, arsenic, and cadmium are naturally present in soil and water, and may be absorbed by plants. Toxicologists must determine the acceptable daily intake level for those substances.

Related Conferences on Food Toxicology

18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2nd International Conference on Food Microbiology November 09-11, 2017 Madrid, Spain; 16th World Congress on Nutrition September 18-20, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; 9th World Nutrition & Health Congress February 20-21, 2017 Berlin, Germany; 11th World Congress on Nutrition and Food Sciences May 29-31, 2017 Osaka, Japan; 11th International Conference on Molecular Nutrition & Dietetics June 12-14, 2017 Rome, Italy.

Related society on food toxicology

European Federation of Food Science and Technology, The Netherlands; Warwick Good Food Society, UK; International Commission on Microbiological Specification for Foods, Australia; International Union of Food Science and Technology, Canada; The Association of Food Technology, Turkey; South African Association for Food Science and Technology, South Africa.

Track 7:-Food Fraud: Detection and Prevention

Food fraud is a collective term used to encompass the deliberate and intentional substitution, addition, tampering, or misrepresentation of food, food ingredients, or food packaging; or false or misleading statements made about a product, for economic gain. Food fraud is a broader term than either the economically motivated adulteration (EMA) defined by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or the more specific general concept of food counterfeiting. Food fraud may not include “adulteration” or “misbranding,” as defined in the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), when it involves acts such as tax-avoidance and smuggling. The economic motivation behind food fraud is distinctly different from those for food safety, food defence, and food quality. The cause of an event might be food fraud, but if a public health threat becomes involved, the effect is an adulterated product and a food safety incident. All of this is under the umbrella of food protection, which encompasses food fraud, food quality, food safety, and food defence. Here is no statutory definition of food fraud, and different countries, researchers and industry groups have defined it in various ways. However, food fraud is most commonly referred to as the intentional defrauding of food and food ingredients for economic gain. Food fraud is estimated to cost the global food industry $10-$15 billion a year. Food fraud can occur in a variety of situations. Food or food ingredients may be substituted for lower-quality, inferior ingredients, or one species for another. Food ingredients may be diluted with water, or main ingredients may be omitted or removed. Some producers deceive consumers, manufactures, retailers, and governments for the sole purpose of making money. Many consumers are not interested in how the food they consume is produced or where it comes from but are more concerned about being able to purchase food inexpensively. The lack of interest and knowledge by the consumer increases the risk of food fraud by producers and manufacturers who are solely interested in making a big profit.

Although the majority of food fraud cases have not resulted in death or serious illnesses, food fraud can still be a food safety concern. Food products can be substituted with a common allergen, such as tree nuts or eggs, and can cause severe adverse reactions to consumers. Unfortunately, food fraud is not a new concept and has been going on for thousands of years. In the middle Ages, when the price of imported spices increased, merchants would substitute spices with seeds, stones or dusts. In the 18th and 19th centuries, milk was commonly diluted with water, sometimes dirty water, and colour with chalk or plaster. Over the past couple of years, there have been several reported food fraud incidents. In 2013, consumers in England, France, Greece and several other countries were duped and unknowingly purchased meatballs, burgers and other food products that contained horse meat. The suppliers of the products were aware that their products contained horse meat, but instead of declaring it on the product labels, the suppliers saw an opportunity to make money and deceive their consumers who thought they were buying beef.

Related Conferences on Food Fraud; Detection & Prevention

18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July 24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2nd International Conference on Food Microbiology November 09-11, 2017 Madrid, Spain; 16th World Congress on Nutrition September 18-20, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; 9th World Nutrition & Health Congress February 20-21, 2017 Berlin, Germany; 11th World Congress on Nutrition and Food Sciences May 29-31, 2017 Osaka, Japan; 11th International Conference on Molecular Nutrition & Dietetics June 12-14, 2017 Rome, Italy.

.Related society on food fraud detection and prevention:-

Institute of Food Technologists, USA; North American Meat Institute, Washington; Specialty Coffee Association of America, USA; Australian Institute of Food Science and Technology, Australia; Warwick Good Food Society, UK.

Track 8:-Nutrition

Nutrition, nourishment, or aliment, is the supply of materials - food - required by organisms and cells to stay alive. In science and human medicine, nutrition is the science or practice of consuming and utilizing foods. IN hospitals, nutrition may refer to the food requirements of patients, including nutritional solutions delivered via an IV (intravenous) or IG (intragastric) tube. Nutritional science studies how the body breaks food down (catabolism) and repairs and creates cells and tissue (anabolism) - catabolism and anabolism = metabolism. Nutritional science also examines how the body responds to food.

Related Conferences on Nutrition

International Conference on  9th World Nutrition & Health Congress February 20-21, 2017 Berlin, Germany; 11th World Congress on Nutrition and Food Sciences May 29-31, 2017 Osaka, Japan; 11th International Conference on Molecular Nutrition & Dietetics June 12-14, 2017 Rome, Italy; 14th International Congress on Nutritional Epidemiology and Malnutrition August 28-30, 2017 Toronto, Canada; 18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July 24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada;  10th International Conference on Clinical Diabetes, Diabetes care & Nutrition July 20-21, 2017 Chicago, USA; 3rd International Conference on Nutraceuticals and Nutrition Supplements July 28-29, 2017 Rome, Italy; 19th International Conference on Nutrigenetics & Functional foods November 16-17, 2017 San Antonio, USA.

Related society on Nutrition

National Association of Citrus Juice Processors, USA; American Cheese Society, USA; The Association of Food Technology, Turkey; International Association of Engineering and Food, USA; International Union of Food Science and Technology, Canada; European Food Safety Authority, Italy; Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Canada; Association of Food Science and Technology of Basque Country, Spain; Institute of Food Technologists, USA; International Wine & Food Society, UK.

Track 9:-Nutraceuticals & Nutrition Supplements

Nutraceuticals is a broad umbrella term that is used to describe any product derived from food sources with extra health benefits in addition to the basic nutritional value found in foods. They can be considered non-specific biological therapies used to promote general well-being, control symptoms and prevent malignant processes. The term “nutraceutical” combines two words – “nutrient” (a nourishing food component) and “pharmaceutical” (a medical drug). The name was coined in 1989 by Stephen De Felice, founder and chairman of the Foundation for Innovation in Medicine, an American organization located in Cranford, New Jersey. The philosophy behind nutraceuticals is to focus on prevention, according to the saying by a Greek physician Hippocrates (known as the father of medicine) who said “let food be your medicine”. Their role in human nutrition is one of the most important areas of investigation, with wide-raging implications for consumers, health-care providers, regulators, food producers and distributors.

 Related Conferences on Nutracuticals & Nutrition supplements

9th World Nutrition & Health Congress February 20-21, 2017 Berlin, Germany; 11th World Congress on Nutrition and Food Sciences May 29-31, 2017 Osaka, Japan;11th International Conference on Molecular Nutrition & Dietetics June 12-14, 2017 Rome, Italy; 14th International Congress on Nutritional Epidemiology and Malnutrition August 28-30, 2017 Toronto, Canada; 10th International Conference on Clinical Diabetes, Diabetes care & Nutrition July 20-21, 2017 Chicago, USA; 18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July 24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada;  3rd International Conference on Nutraceuticals and Nutrition Supplements July 28-29, 2017 Rome, Italy; 16th World Congress on Nutrition September 18-20, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland.

Related society on Nutraceuticals & Nutrition Supplements

National Association of Citrus Juice Processors, USA; American Cheese Society, USA; The Association of Food Technology, Turkey; International Association of Engineering and Food, USA; International Union of Food Science and Technology, Canada; European Food Safety Authority, Italy; Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Canada; Association of Food Science and Technology of Basque Country, Spain; Institute of Food Technologists, USA; International Wine & Food Society, UK.

Track 10:- Malnutrition & Undernutrition

Think back on everything you have eaten over the last 24 hours. Do you think that your diet is well balanced and that you are getting the appropriate nutrients you need? Proper nutrition is very important to maintaining a healthy body and mind. The body requires over 40 essential nutrients to function properly, including vitamins, minerals, amino acids, protein and carbohydrates. In addition to the quality of nutrients consumed, the body must also maintain a certain quantity of food to remain healthy. Humans must consume a certain amount of calories each day in order to maintain a productive and energetic lifestyle. A large problem facing the human population today is malnutrition. Malnutrition is when a person's diet has an imbalance of the essential nutrients that the body needs to remain healthy. This imbalance in nutrients can weaken the person's immune system and body and make them more susceptible to illnesses. Malnutrition can also cause delays in a child's physical and mental development. Malnutrition is often divided into two different types, which are under-nutrition and over-nutrition. These two different types of malnutrition vary by what the person is consuming, how it is influencing their body and the prevalence in certain regions of the world.

Under-Nutrition:-

When most people think of malnutrition, they often think of someone who is suffering from under-nutrition. Under-nutrition occurs when a person consumes a diet that does not meet the necessary requirements for the amount of essential nutrients or calories a person needs to remain healthy. This type of malnutrition can occur when people are not eating enough food, or when the food they are eating does not contain well-balanced nutrients. The World Health Organization estimates that one out of every three people is suffering from a deficiency in one or more essential nutrients. The symptoms associated with under-nutrition vary by deficiency, but all deficiencies will eventually cause permanent harm to the body. Throughout the world, there are three common deficiencies that people suffer from. Lack of vitamin A in the diet is a very large problem worldwide and results in many cases of blindness in children each year. A deficiency in iron can cause a person to become anaemic, which can result in fatigue, increased risk of infection and increased risk of haemorrhaging during childbirth. Iodine deficiency is also very common, with one-third of the human population suffering from a lack of iodine. Iodine is important for proper functioning of the thyroid gland, which is responsible for producing hormones that manage the body's metabolic rate. A lack of iodine can cause stunted growth, mental delays and the creation of goitres, which are when the thyroid glands at the base of the neck become swollen.

Related Conferences on Malnutrition & Undernutrition

9th World Nutrition & Health Congress February 20-21, 2017 Berlin, Germany; 11th World Congress on Nutrition and Food Sciences May 29-31, 2017 Osaka, Japan;11th International Conference on Molecular Nutrition & Dietetics June 12-14, 2017 Rome, Italy; 18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July 24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 14th International Congress on Nutritional Epidemiology and Malnutrition August 28-30, 2017 Toronto, Canada;10th International Conference on Clinical Diabetes, Diabetes care & Nutrition July 20-21, 2017 Chicago, USA; 3rd International Conference on Nutraceuticals and Nutrition Supplements July 28-29, 2017 Rome, Italy; 16th World Congress on Nutrition September 18-20, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland.

Related society on Malnutrition & undernutrition

National Association of Citrus Juice Processors, USA; American Cheese Society, USA; The Association of Food Technology, Turkey; International Association of Engineering and Food, USA; International Union of Food Science and Technology, Canada; European Food Safety Authority, Italy; Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Canada; Association of Food Science and Technology of Basque Country, Spain; Institute of Food Technologists, USA; International Wine & Food Society, Uk.

Track 11:- Lipid Science & Technology

Centre for Lipid Research of CSIR-IICT is recognized nationally and internationally as centre for excellence in the area of lipid research. Vegetable oil industry is one of the major industries in the world with a huge turnover next to petrochemicals. Vegetable oils not only play a significant role in nutrition but find use in diverse applications. Centre for Lipid Research has given major thrust on basic as well as applied research. The vision and goals of the Lipids Group mainly pertain to Newer Processing Methodologies for Vegetable Oils, Oleo chemicals and Specialty Chemicals, Bio lubricants, Biodiesel and Nutraceuticals. Centre for Lipid Research is presently executing several R & D projects with the financial support of several Government Agencies and Industrial Organizations. Centre for Lipid Research has established a good rapport with the Indian Industries and CSIR has taken a decision to strengthen this group by recognizing it as “The Centre of Excellence for Lipid Research”. The Centre has established state of art facilities in the areas of Vegetable Oils and Allied Products, Biodiesel, and Lubricants in addition to some specialized pilot units. This facility caters the needs of the vegetable oil and allied product industry on par with the International Standards. The Centre for Lipid Research is also organizing several Human Resource Development Programmes for the benefit of the vegetable oil and allied industry. In the present scenario, renewable raw materials are gaining prominence offering greater opportunities for researchers to develop processes and products based on green technologies and the Centre for Lipid Research is geared up to meet the future challenges.

Related Conferences on Lipid Science & Technology

9th World Nutrition & Health Congress February 20-21, 2017 Berlin, Germany;11th World Congress on Nutrition and Food Sciences May 29-31, 2017 Osaka, Japan; 11th International Conference on Molecular Nutrition & Dietetics June 12-14, 2017 Rome, Italy; 14th International Congress on Nutritional Epidemiology and Malnutrition August 28-30, 2017 Toronto, Canada; 18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July 24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 10th International Conference on Clinical Diabetes, Diabetes care & Nutrition July 20-21, 2017 Chicago, USA; 3rd International Conference on Nutraceuticals and Nutrition Supplements July 28-29, 2017 Rome, Italy; 16th World Congress on Nutrition September 18-20, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland.

Related society on lipid science & technology

National Association of Citrus Juice Processors, USA; American Cheese Society, USA; The Association of Food Technology, Turkey; International Association of Engineering and Food, USA; International Union of Food Science and Technology, Canada; European Food Safety Authority, Italy; Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Canada; Association of Food Science and Technology of Basque Country, Spain; Institute of Food Technologists, USA; International Wine & Food Society, Uk.

Track 12:-Nutrients & Nutrition Science

The Nutritional Science major (formerly known as Human Nutrition and Foods) focuses on the physiological and biological aspects of foods and nutrients. Opportunities for nutritional scientists include research positions in laboratories, hospitals, and industry. This major prepares students for graduate study. The program also meets premedical and pre-dental requirements, and many students go on to professional schools. It is not necessary to complete an additional application form in order to be accepted into the Nutritional Science program. On their application to The University of Maryland, both freshman and transfer students should simply declare their major as Nutritional Science. The Nutritional Science program code for your application is 1306H. Students who are enrolled in other majors at the University of Maryland should contact the department for information about changing their major to Nutritional Science.

Related Conferences on:-Nutrients & Nutrition Science

19th International Conference on Probiotic Nutrition and Public Health Nutrition, May 18-19, 2017, 14th International Congress on Nutritional Epidemiology and Malnutrition August 28-30, 2017 Toronto, Canada; 10th International Conference on Clinical Diabetes, Diabetes care & Nutrition July 20-21, 2017 Chicago, USA; 18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July 24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 3rd International Conference on Nutraceuticals and Nutrition Supplements July 28-29, 2017 Rome, Italy; 16th World Congress on Nutrition September 18-20, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland.

Related society on Nutrients & nutrition science

 National Association of Citrus Juice Processors, USA; American Cheese Society, USA; The Association of Food Technology, Turkey; International Association of Engineering and Food, USA; International Union of Food Science and Technology, Canada; European Food Safety Authority, Italy; Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Canada; Association of Food Science and Technology of Basque Country, Spain; Institute of Food Technologists, USA; International Wine & Food Society, UK.

Track 13:-Dieticians & Nutritionists

A dietician (or dietician) is an expert in dietetics; that is, human nutrition and the regulation of diet. A dietician alters their patient's nutrition based upon their medical condition and individual needs. Dieticians are the only healthcare professionals licensed to assess, diagnose, and treat nutritional problems. For example, safely regulating the diet of a patient with Crohn's disease is out of physician's scope of expertise, thus a dietician must be called to permit any changes based upon their knowledge of nutritional biochemistry. Dieticians work in a variety of settings from clinical to community and public policy to media communications.

Related Conferences on Dieticians & Nutritionists

14th International Congress on Nutritional Epidemiology and Malnutrition August 28-30, 2017 Toronto, Canada; 10th International Conference on Clinical Diabetes, Diabetes care & Nutrition July 20-21, 2017 Chicago, USA; 3rd International Conference on Nutraceuticals and Nutrition Supplements July 28-29, 2017 Rome, Italy; 16th World Congress on Nutrition September 18-20, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; 18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July 24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 9th World Nutrition & Health Congress February 20-21, 2017 Berlin, Germany; 11th World Congress on Nutrition and Food Sciences May 29-31, 2017 Osaka, Japan; 11th International Conference on Molecular Nutrition & Dietetics June 12-14, 2017 Rome, Italy.

Related society on Dieticians & nutritionists

international Union of Food Science and Technology, USA; Association of Catalan Food Sciences, Spain; Ukrainian Union of Food Science and Technology, Ukraine; European Food Information Resource, Belgium; Chinese American Food Society, USA; Swiss Food Research, Switzerland; ISEKI-food Association, Austria; European Food Safety Authority, Italy.

Track 14:-Probiotic, Functional & Baby Food

The growing awareness of the relationship between diet and health has led to an increasing demand for food products that support health above and beyond providing basic nutrition. Probiotics and prebiotics are components present in foods, or that can be incorporated into foods, which yield health benefits related to their interactions with the gastrointestinal tract (GI). While the benefits of prebiotics have come to light in more recent years, recognition of probiotic effects dates back to the 19th century when the French scientist Louis Pasteur (1822 –1895) postulated the importance of microorganisms in human life; this was further reinforced by work done by 1908 Nobel Prize-winner Elie Metchnikoff.

Related Conferences on:-Probiotic, Functional & Baby Food

14th International Congress on Nutritional Epidemiology and Malnutrition August 28-30, 2017 Toronto, Canada; 10th International Conference on Clinical Diabetes, Diabetes care & Nutrition July 20-21, 2017 Chicago, USA; 3rd International Conference on Nutraceuticals and Nutrition Supplements July 28-29, 2017 Rome, Italy; 18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages October 02-04, 2017 Chicago, USA; 2nd International conference on Food Security and Sustainability June 26-28, 2017 San Diego, USA; 6th International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures June 5-7, 2017 Milan ,Italy; 2nd International Conference on Food Chemistry and Nutrition July 24-26, 2017 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 16th World Congress on Nutrition September 18-20, 2017 Zurich, Switzerland; 9th World Nutrition & Health Congress February 20-21, 2017 Berlin, Germany; 11th World Congress on Nutrition and Food Sciences May 29-31, 2017 Osaka, Japan; 11th International Conference on Molecular Nutrition & Dietetics June 12-14, 2017 Rome, Italy.

Related society on Probiotic, Functional & baby food

International Union of Food Science and Technology, USA; Association of Catalan Food Sciences, Spain; Ukrainian Union of Food Science and Technology, Ukraine; European Food Information Resource, Belgium; Chinese American Food Society, USA; Swiss Food Research, Switzerland; ISEKI-food Association, Austria; European Food Safety Authority, Italy; Dairy Industry Association of Australia.

 

Market Analysis

Market Analysis Report

INTRODUCTION

The 17th International Conference on Food & Nutrition  Conference to be held during May 22- 24 2017 at Las Vegas USA.The importance of food and nutrition in human development is widely recognized in both high income and middle to low income countries. Malnutrition in all its forms amounts to an intolerable burden not only on national health systems but the entire cultural, social and economic fabric of nations, and is the greatest impediment to the fulfilment of human potential. Investing in nutrition therefore makes economic sense because it reduces health care costs, improves productivity and economic growth and promotes education, intellectual capacity and social development for present and future generations. Nutrition is a foundation for development, as is elaborated in the UNSCN brief compilation from 2002, designed to facilitate dialogue between nutrition and other development professionals and to make the case for integrating nutrition into the work of the development community. Income poverty reduction and increased food production alone will not solve the nutrition problems of the poor in low income countries. Tackling global nutrition problems is essential for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The critical role of nutrition for reaching the MDGs was the topic an UNSCN Special Information Meeting held with ECOSOC at the UN in June 2005, and of UNSCN News 28 and the 31st UNSCN Session.

Moreover, good nutrition is a human right. Nutrition security encompasses many rights, especially the right to adequate food and to the highest attainable standard of health. It includes children's rights to food, health and care as well as survival and development. Besides that, it comprises women’s right to appropriate services in connection with pregnancy, confinement and the post-natal period along with adequate nutrition during pregnancy and lactation. This is the focus area of the UNSCN Working Group on Nutrition, Ethics and Human Rights and the topic of UNSCN News No 18 and No 30.

Nutrition is ever more important in the light of the recent financial and food price crises. These crises increase malnutrition among the most vulnerable people in developing countries, with pregnant women and children being the hardest hit. The UNSCN has developed a technical briefing note as well as an advocacy note (2 pages) on the nutrition impacts of the global financial and food crises. On 14 October 2008, the UNSCN held a Side Event focusing on the Impact of High Food Prices on Nutrition at the 34th Session of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS), 14-17 October 2008,FAO, Rome.

These recent crises overlap with and deepen the effects other crises. Nutrition remains a concern in emergencies like conflict or natural disaster. The UNSCN Working Group on Nutrition in Emergencies is a very active one and has pioneered cooperation and thinking in the field. One recent achievement was the community-based treatment of severe malnutrition, such as in UNSCN Nutrition Policy Paper 21. The UNSCN Secretariat has through its Nutrition Information in Crisis Situations (NICS) reported on the nutrition situation of refugees, displaced and resident populations affected by a crisis since 1993.

Moreover, undernutrition has adverse intergenerational effects that significantly increase its economic and other social costs. This is elaborated in the fourth of the UNSCN Reports on the World Nutrition Situation as well as in the report of the Commission on the Nutrition Challenges of the 21st Century. The UNSCN News No 11 on Maternal and Child Nutrition in 1995 first presented the life-cycle approach. The first ever meeting to discuss low birth weight and how to prevent it, led to the development of a Nutrition Policy Paper No 18. Several UNSCN Working Groups also focus on nutrition across the lifecourse, such as the one on Nutrition Throughout the Lifecycle, or on specific stages of the lifecycle, such as the Working Groups on Breastfeeding and Complementary Feeding and on Nutrition of School Age Children.

At the same time the world is also increasingly affected by another sort of malnutrition, namely overweight and obesity which as proposed in UNSCN News No 29 may constitute a new nutritional emergency. The emerging global epidemic of non-communicable or chronic diseases is no longer a problem restricted to affluent, industrialized countries. It is increasingly affecting low income countries and contributing to their existing burden of undernutrition. Thus in low income societies, diseases caused by caloric inadequacy and deficiency continue to persist, but now co-exist with the growing presence of nutrition related chronic diseases; this is the double burden of malnutrition. UNSCN News No 32 and No 33 look at the double burden of malnutrition at the global level and in West Africa, respectively.

Micronutrient deficiencies being the risk factor for many diseases, can contribute to high rates of morbidity and mortality and even moderate levels of deficiency can have detrimental effects on human health. They are widespread in industrialized nations, but even more so in the developing regions of the world. Young children and women of reproductive age are among those most at risk of developing micronutrient deficiencies. The forthcoming Nutrition Policy Paper 22 will present a systematic review of multi-micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy in developing countries, looking at how these could improve iron status as well as have an effect on critical outcomes like birth weight. The three most common forms of micronutrient malnutrition are iron, vitamin A and iodine deficiency. Measures to correct these major micronutrient deficiencies are well-known. The recent UNSCN News 35 describes how the control of iodine deficiency disorders through salt iodization has been a major accomplishment over the last decades. Measures to control Vitamin A deficiencies were addressed in Nutrition Policy Papers 13 and 14, whereas Nutrition Policy Paper 9 described measures to control iron deficiencies. Since the inception of the SCN a series of different Working Groups have focused on specific micronutrients, today the Working Group on Micronutrients cover all aspects of vitamin and mineral nutrition.

Nutritional status is an outcome of a series of determinants clustered into food, health and care. Each of these clusters is essential but alone insufficient for achieving nutrition security. The UNSCN network addresses the causes of malnutrition at the immediate, underlying and basic level. For example, the Working Group on Household Food Security is concerned with food security of vulnerable households. Others are focusing on interactions between nutrition and health, such as the Working Group on Nutrition and HIV/AIDS. Reducing malnutrition requires attention to the three areas of food, health and care. However, in order to achieve sustainable improvements, capacity development is essential. The aim of the Working Group on Capacity Development in Food and Nutrition is therefore to assist developing regions enhance individual, organizational and institutional capacity in the area of food and nutrition.

Diet-related disease has a larger effect on health in Aboriginal communities than smoking and alcohol. Indigenous Australians are 1.5 times more likely to be obese than non-Indigenous Australians. Chronic kidney disease is twice as prevalent for Indigenous Australians. Lower rates of daily exercise, nutrition and food security are major contributors to preventable disease in Aboriginal communities.

Indigenous communities in remote regional areas often find it challenging to access nutritious food. As Aboriginal communities lost access to their traditional land, processed, western-style foods replaced traditional nutritious diets. Often, the only food available today in remote Indigenous communities is cheap, processed and highly unhealthy. The standard of health in urban and rural Aboriginal communities cannot improve without action targeting nutrition. Combined with unemployment and low income, transit costs and inflation caused the mining boom have left many Indigenous communities struggling to afford expensive fresh food. In Australia, the challenge to ensure adequate nutritional intake for the entire population poses a major problem. Large numbers of Australians experience obesity due to poor lifestyle choice while others, such as those in remote Aboriginal communities, are food insecure because they do not have access to affordable healthy food.

The 2016 Closing the Gap report pays little attention to the importance of improving nutrition. While some states, such as Queensland and the Northern Territory, have had some success in implementing health and nutrition programmes, the holistic benefits of placing nutrition at the forefront of the Commonwealth policy agenda would not be insignificant. Creating access to affordable and nutritious food should be a policy priority to increase food security for Aboriginal Australians, not just in remote communities but in urban areas, too. Greater education programmes targeting Indigenous people to reduce consumption of sugary soft drinks and processed foods should be paired with subsidies on fresh, nutritious food. A previous FDI paper has noted the benefit of community participation in encouraging healthy eating habits, including the development of community and school kitchen gardens, city farms and farmers’ markets to encourage a healthy connection with food.

Time and patience is undoubtedly required if meaningful change is to be seen to close the gap. While there have been reductions in smoking rates, increased health checks and improvements to educational outcomes for Indigenous children, diet-related disease remains a significant impediment to social development. Actions targeting nutrition must, therefore, be made a priority for the government’s policy agenda, both for rural remote communities and for those living in urban areas. Health is a key ingredient for alleviating social disadvantage. Enhancing food security has the ability to improve standards of living, reduce the frequency of disease, further scholastic efforts and provide future generations with a better chance of success. Australia has great need for a long-term, bipartisan strategy to ensure health and nutrition gain status as a priority in order to close the gap.

Global Aseptic Packaging 2008-2016:-

Fig 1

Germany will be working to ensure that the G7 summit at Schloss Elmau sends a strong signal for the fight against hunger and for food and nutrition security.” This statement was made by Thomas Silberhorn, Parliamentary State Secretary to the Federal Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development, at the presentation of the Global Nutrition Report. The event was co-hosted by the BMZ, CARE Germany-Luxembourg and GAIN.

The Report provides a comprehensive picture of the global food and nutrition situation and highlights the fact that poor nutrition plays a role in all countries of the world, be it in the context of the fight against hunger and malnutrition, be it in the form of anaemia and stunting or in the form of excess weight among children and adults in industrialised countries.

                                                               Fig 2

Silberhorn pointed out that the improvement of global nutrition required interdisciplinary analysis and action. He said, “Health issues play an important role in this context, as do water supply and sanitation, food production, and information and education campaigns on the consequences of poor nutrition. Fighting malnutrition is a focus of our work under our special initiative One World – No Hunger. Every year, we provide more than a billion euros from the budget of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development for food and nutrition security projects that pursue this type of integrated approach.”

As he introduced the Report, Lawrence Haddad, Senior Research Fellow at the renowned International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), emphasised that healthy nutrition was vital to sustainable development in all countries. National governments, civil society and the private sector need to jointly shoulder responsibility for fighting hunger and malnutrition, and they need to coordinate their actions.

The findings and recommendations of the report are to inform the debate on the new Sustainable Development Goals that will be adopted by the United Nations later this year. This is not only relevant for the goal of a healthy and balanced diet for millions of people but also in terms of the risks which continuing malnutrition may pose to the achievement of other goals.

Speaking at the event GAIN’s Executive Director, Marc Van Ameringen said: “The Global Nutrition Report is a wake-up call for the international community, making a convincing case for pushing nutrition to the top of the development agenda. With the launch of the Sustainable Development Goals later this year, we have a window of opportunity to put health and nutrition at the centre of the food system. Low cost nutritious products should be available to all individuals, regardless of where in the world they live.”

High-ranking representatives of other institutions were present at the event, including Professor Joachim von Braun, Director of the Center for Development Research; Tom Arnold, coordinator of the global Scaling Up Nutrition Movement; Dr. Wolfgang Jamann, Secretary General of CARE International.

Market Research Globally-

US is the largest market for sports nutrition in the world and the category experienced another positive year, with current retail value growth of 11% in 2015 to reach US$6.7 billion. In 2015, growth was driven by the rapid expansion of its demographic base. Whilst sports nutrition products previously targeted core athletes and body builders, greater numbers of casual users have begun using the products as they are more aware of protein’s health benefits and of the importance of active lifestyles. In addition to younger casual users, more middle-aged and elderly consumers are engaged in sports activities including easy exercise like walking. Senior consumers will continue to show greater interest in taking sports nutrition products to gain protein that helps to maintain muscle mass and sustain optimal levels of protein intake. Sports nutrition manufacturers are capitalising on the expanding market by launching new products with less complex formulations, more convenient formats and wider distribution in more frequently visited grocery channels. The new products and increased availability via more popular channels has supported the growth of sports nutrition industry in the US.

                                                                    Fig 3

The foods you choose to eat can have a direct impact on your ability to enjoy life to its fullest. Perhaps the most obvious positive effect of food is the pleasurable feeling you get from eating a good-tasting meal. It might be a plate of grilled chicken, corn-on-the-cob, fresh vine-ripened tomatoes, and a baked potato, or a steaming dish of spaghetti topped with a zesty tomato sauce. Your diet can have long-term effects on your health as well. Diet plays a major role in promoting and maintaining good health, preventing some chronic diseases and treating others, and speeding recovery from injuries. In earlier times, diseases such as goiter and pellagra were relatively common—both are caused by nutritional deficiencies and cured by diets containing sufficient amounts of a particular nutrient. In the case of goiter, iodine is the missing nutrient; with pellagra it is mainly niacin, a B vitamin. These diseases are rare today in the United States because most Americans get enough of these essential nutrients in their diets.In 2012, more than 47 million Americans lived in households that had difficulty putting food on the table and USDA helped provide a hunger safety net for these families. In times of record need, USDA has provided critical nutrition assistance to millions of families. Learn more about how USDA is delivering results and working hard to provide a safe, sufficient and nutritious food supply for the American people. Good nutrition during childhood and adolescence is essential for growth and development, health and well-being, and the prevention of some chronic diseases. Yet many American children’s diets fall considerably short of recommended dietary standards. Furthermore, poor diet and physical inactivity, resulting in an energy imbalance, are the most important factors contributing to the increase in obesity in childhood. Obesity is the most pressing challenge to nutritional health in this first decade of the 21st century (CDC, 1999). The major nutrition issues among children and adolescents have shifted from nutrient deficiency diseases, common in the first half of the 20th century, to concerns today about overconsumption, poor dietary quality, and food choices. However, food insecurity remains a concern among the poor (Briefel and Johnson, 2004). Consuming too few calories or too many nutritionally empty calories is among the most important public health problems, according to Marion Nestle, a New York University professor and coauthor of the book "Why Calories Count: From Science to Politics." Nestle says that the health consequences of overeating -- obesity or diabetes -- and under eating -- depression, irritability or organ failure -- affect billions of people globally.

                                                   Fig 4

The US is the world's largest economy and its 320 million people produced US$48,000 per capita GDP in 2011. One in five Americans lives in one of the country's eight largest cities. Its consumers expect competitive pricing and offers, and are increasingly concerned about sustainable production, transport and packaging. It is New Zealand's third largest food and beverage market, with US$2.1 billion exports in 2011.

                                      Fig 5

                                                   Fig 6

US packaged food sales totalled US$332 billion in 2011. The bakery category was worth 21 percent of the total; dairy, 16 percent; frozen processed food, 10 percent; confectionery, 10 percent; and sweet and savoury snacks, 10 percent.    Packaged food sales increased by a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 2.5 percent during 2006-2011, driven by more meals eaten at home instead of eating out. The highest growth was in snack bars, with a CAGR of 6.6 percent over the five-year period. Pasta grew 5.9 percent in that time, noodles, 4.8 percent; spreads, 4.6 percent; and dairy products, 3.4 percent.

   Fresh food sales comprised 78 million tonnes by volume in 2011; with meat at 31 percent market share; vegetables, 25 percent; fruits, 23 percent; starchy roots, seven percent; and eggs, six percent. Market growth was stagnant from 2006-2011.

  The US wine market is the world's second largest behind France, totalling US$34 billion in 2011, equalling 2.73 billion litres. Still light grape wines dominate with an 86 percent market share in value and 91 percent in volume. Sparkling wines have an eight percent share by value and five percent in volume. CAGR sales growth over 2006-2011 was three percent, with imports from Argentina up 13 percent and New Zealand up 40 percent.

   US organic food sales of US$27 billion in 2010 accounted for 45 percent of the global total, and represented a CAGR of 11.6 percent between 2006 and 2011.  The 2011 dairy market was estimated at US$51 billion, representing 15 percent of the global total. Cheese dominates at a 40 percent market share; milk accounts for 34 percent; the yoghurt sector at 12 percent of the total is particularly dynamic. Spreadable fats accounted for eight percent of market share, cream was at five percent, and chilled desserts, one percent. 2006-2011 CAGR was 5.3 percent. By distribution channel, grocery retail sales were valued at US$930 billion in 2011, and foodservice sales estimated at US$445 billion.

  In 2010, supermarkets had a 36 percent share of the grocery trade, followed by hypermarkets at 29 percent. Grocery retail sales grew by 2.2 percent CAGR from 2006-2011. In 2010 about 37 percent of the foodservice market was fast food establishments, 33 percent were full-service restaurants. CAGR was stagnant at 0.6 percent during 2006-2011. There has been improvement following the recession late in the decade, which hit the foodservice market particularly hard.

Europe-

 The major manufacturing hubs in the globe are Europe which constitutes the majority share in the food and nutrition and enhancer market along with North America. European market is a mature market and has several regulatory bodies to regulate stringently the use of food flavours and enhancers, thereby taking care of the consumers of the nations. Germany constitutes the major share having 24% followed by the UK (23%), Spain (10%), Netherland (5%) and Italy (9%). $ 823 million US dollar is the market size by value of the synthetic flavour and $ 755.65 million US dollar is the market size by value of the natural in the year 2014.

 Asia-

Asia Pacific is a huge and increasingly influential market in the supply of food and beverage ingredients. As well as accounting for 35% of global value added ingredient supply in this category, it is also a melting point of diverse trends and influences. In 2012, Asia Pacific accounted for 35% of global use of value-added food and drink ingredients, equivalent to almost 8.5 million tones out of a global total of 24.2 million tones. Asia Pacific is also one of the fastest growing regions, with a forecast CAGR of 4% over 2012-2017, behind only the Middle East and Africa, with 5%. This means that by 2017, Asia will have increased its share of the global total to 38%.

19% growth in China-

Asia is the fastest growing region in infant nutrition, at an annual rate of some 19%, largely driven by China. In China, improved living standards amongst the growing middle class and increased health awareness are stimulating purchases. Demand for imported products, regarded as safer since the recent melamine scandal, has been pushing prices up. Currently there are 160 million children aged between 3 and 13 years old in China. A 2012 baby boom in the year of the dragon, together with China’s one child policy, means demand for premium products will continue to grow in the coming years. In China, the number of mothers who breastfeed exclusively for 6 months is reported to be less than 30%. This is partly because baby formula is thought to be healthier and help babies bulk up – which is important in Chinese culture with many people believing that a large baby is a healthy baby.

22 million infants in Indonesia-

Indonesia is another key country that is driving market growth. It has the world’s 4th largest population, around 22 million children under the age of 4, Asia’s second-highest birth rate and rising wealth. Multinational companies are building new production facilities there to meet the increasing demand – Nestlé has invested $200 million to start production of powdered milk and its Milo drink this year.  Baby milk powder producers are linking the health benefits of milk with both mental and physical success, which appeals to their target group of middle-class parents. Since malnutrition had caused the death of millions of young children in Indonesia, the Government has encouraged exclusive breast-feeding from birth until 6 months. However, this is a real challenge for women in a modernising society and more are choosing powdered infant milk as an alternative.

Premium innovation in Japan

-Japan is characterised by innovative use of ingredients, such as prebiotics and specific milk protein fractions. This trend is also rapidly developing in other parts of Asia.  Retail prices are much more expensive in Japan than in any other country. This helps companies to invest in research and develop very sophisticated products. The Japanese market is more technology driven, while other markets are more consumer driven.

Middle East features

The Middle East and Africa have especially high growth in female labour participation.  The baby population is now close to 200 million. These two facts hold the key to explaining strong market growth.Saudi Arabia is by far the largest market in the region and has seen double-digit growth for the past three years. As mothers have gained increasing awareness of their childrens’ nutritional needs, the demand for food products that are natural, fortified and offer health benefits has been rising.

South America 

Baby milk powders have been present in South America for decades and are usually incorporated as a supplement in babies’ diets. Regular use of powdered milk has become increasingly popular as more women have entered the workforce, leaving them with less time to spend at home and breastfeed their babies. It is common across Latin America for mothers to be given short maternity leave periods – in Mexico mothers have only 45 days of maternity leave before they must return to full time employment. Improving economic conditions mean that more consumers can afford regular purchases. More specialised products have also become available, notably in Mexico and Argentina.

USA: Market structure

US is the largest market for sports nutrition in the world and the category experienced another positive year, with current retail value growth of 11% in 2015 to reach US$6.7 billion. In 2015, growth was driven by the rapid expansion of its demographic base. Whilst sports nutrition products previously targeted core athletes and body builders, greater numbers of casual users have begun using the products as they are more aware of protein’s health benefits and of the importance of active lifestyles. In addition to younger casual users, more middle-aged and elderly consumers are engaged in sports activities including easy exercise like walking. Senior consumers will continue to show greater interest in taking sports nutrition products to gain protein that helps to maintain muscle mass and sustain optimal levels of protein intake. Sports nutrition manufacturers are capitalising on the expanding market by launching new products with less complex formulations, more convenient formats and wider distribution in more frequently visited grocery channels. The new products and increased availability via more popular channels has supported the growth of sports nutrition industry in the US.

The foods you choose to eat can have a direct impact on your ability to enjoy life to its fullest. Perhaps the most obvious positive effect of food is the pleasurable feeling you get from eating a good-tasting meal. It might be a plate of grilled chicken, corn-on-the-cob, fresh vine-ripened tomatoes, and a baked potato, or a steaming dish of spaghetti topped with a zesty tomato sauce. Your diet can have long-term effects on your health as well. Diet plays a major role in promoting and maintaining good health, preventing some chronic diseases and treating others, and speeding recovery from injuries. In earlier times, diseases such as goiter and pellagra were relatively common—both are caused by nutritional deficiencies and cured by diets containing sufficient amounts of a particular nutrient. In the case of goiter, iodine is the missing nutrient; with pellagra it is mainly niacin, a B vitamin. These diseases are rare today in the United States because most Americans get enough of these essential nutrients in their diets.In 2012, more than 47 million Americans lived in households that had difficulty putting food on the table and USDA helped provide a hunger safety net for these families. In times of record need, USDA has provided critical nutrition assistance to millions of families. Learn more about how USDA is delivering results and working hard to provide a safe, sufficient and nutritious food supply for the American people. Good nutrition during childhood and adolescence is essential for growth and development, health and well-being, and the prevention of some chronic diseases. Yet many American children’s diets fall considerably short of recommended dietary standards. Furthermore, poor diet and physical inactivity, resulting in an energy imbalance, are the most important factors contributing to the increase in obesity in childhood. Obesity is the most pressing challenge to nutritional health in this first decade of the 21st century (CDC, 1999). The major nutrition issues among children and adolescents have shifted from nutrient deficiency diseases, common in the first half of the 20th century, to concerns today about overconsumption, poor dietary quality, and food choices. However, food insecurity remains a concern among the poor (Briefel and Johnson, 2004). Consuming too few calories or too many nutritionally empty calories is among the most important public health problems, according to Marion Nestle, a New York University professor and coauthor of the book "Why Calories Count: From Science to Politics." Nestle says that the health consequences of overeating -- obesity or diabetes -- and under eating -- depression, irritability or organ failure -- affect billions of people globally.

The US is the world's largest economy and its 320 million people produced US$48,000 per capita GDP in 2011. One in five Americans lives in one of the country's eight largest cities. Its consumers expect competitive pricing and offers, and are increasingly concerned about sustainable production, transport and packaging. It is New Zealand's third largest food and beverage market, with US$2.1 billion exports in 2011.

• US packaged food sales totalled US$332 billion in 2011. The bakery category was worth 21 percent of the total; dairy, 16 percent; frozen processed food, 10 percent; confectionery, 10 percent; and sweet and savoury snacks, 10 percent.

•    Packaged food sales increased by a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 2.5 percent during 2006-2011, driven by more meals eaten at home instead of eating out. The highest growth was in snack bars, with a CAGR of 6.6 percent over the five-year period. Pasta grew 5.9 percent in that time, noodles, 4.8 percent; spreads, 4.6 percent; and dairy products, 3.4 percent.

•     Fresh food sales comprised 78 million tonnes by volume in 2011; with meat at 31 percent market share; vegetables, 25 percent; fruits, 23 percent; starchy roots, seven percent; and eggs, six percent. Market growth was stagnant from 2006-2011.

•   The US wine market is the world's second largest behind France, totalling US$34 billion in 2011, equalling 2.73 billion litres. Still light grape wines dominate with an 86 percent market share in value and 91 percent in volume. Sparkling wines have an eight percent share by value and five percent in volume. CAGR sales growth over 2006-2011 was three percent, with imports from Argentina up 13 percent and New Zealand up 40 percent.

•  US organic food sales of US$27 billion in 2010 accounted for 45 percent of the global total, and represented a CAGR of 11.6 percent between 2006 and 2011.

The 2011 dairy market was estimated at US$51 billion, representing 15 percent of the global total. Cheese dominates at a 40 percent market share; milk accounts for 34 percent; the yoghurt sector at 12 percent of the total is particularly dynamic. Spreadable fats accounted for eight percent of market share, cream was at five percent, and chilled desserts, one percent. 2006-2011 CAGR was 5.3 percent.

• By distribution channel, grocery retail sales were valued at US$930 billion in 2011, and foodservice sales estimated at US$445 billion.

•  In 2010, supermarkets had a 36 percent share of the grocery trade, followed by hypermarkets at 29 percent. Grocery retail sales grew by 2.2 percent CAGR from 2006-2011.

•  In 2010 about 37 percent of the foodservice market was fast food establishments, 33 percent were full-service restaurants. CAGR was stagnant at 0.6 percent during 2006-2011. There has been improvement following the recession late in the decade, which hit the foodservice market particularly hard.

Universities in USA

University of California--Davis

Cornell University

Harvard University

University of Massachusetts--Amherst

University of Wisconsin--Madison

University of Minnesota--Twin Cities

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey--New Brunswick

University of Illinois--Urbana-Champaign

Michigan State University

Ohio State University--Columbus

Iowa State University

Tufts University

University of Georgia

Texas A&M University--College Station

Washington State University

North Carolina State University--Raleigh

Pennsylvania State University--University Park

University of Maryland--College Park

Kansas State University

Oregon State University

University of Nebraska--Lincoln

Colorado State University

University of Arizona

Michigan State University

Mississippi State University

North Dakota State University

Oklahoma State University

Texas A&M University

Tufts University

University of Florida

Society in USA

ASN (American society for nutrition)

American nutrition association

USDA (United States Department of Agriculture

Eat right (academy of nutrition and dietetics)

NS75( the nutrition society)

World public health nutrition association

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

International Wine & Food Society

Slow Food

Medscape(Processed Food Is Vital in US Diet, Nutrition Society States¬)

Society for the anthropology of food and nutrition

Food politics (conflict of nutrition societies: American society of nutrition

ANFP(Association of nutrition & foodservice professionals

Nutrition society of NEW ZEALAND

Canadian nutrition society

Research Institution in USA

  • LATIN AMERICA

Antigua and Barbuda-Government of Antigua and Barbuda

Argentina-Association of Dietitians and Nutritionist-Dietitians

Bahamas-Ministry of Health

Barbados-National Nutrition Centre, Ministry of Health

Belize-Ministry of Health

Brazil-Secretariat of Health Care, Ministry of Health

Chile-Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), the University of Chile

Colombia- Instituto Colombiano de Bienestar Familiar

Costa Rica-Ministry of Health

Cuba-Institute of Nutrition and Food Hygiene

Dominica-Health Promotion Department, Ministry of Health and Social Security

Dominican Republic-Ministry of Public Health

El Salvador-Nutrition Department, Ministry of Health

Grenada-Grenada Food and Nutrition Council

Guatemala-Ministry of Public Health and Social Assistance

Guyana-Ministry of Health

Honduras-Ministry of Health

Jamaica-Ministry of Health

Panama-Ministry of Health

Mexico-  National Institute of Public Health

Paraguay-National Institute for Food and Nutrition

Saint Kitts and Nevis-Ministry of Health

Saint Lucia-Government of Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Ministry of Health, Wellness and the Environment

Uruguay-Ministry of Public Health

Venezuela-Bengoa Foundation for Food and Nutrition

  • NORTH AMERICA

United States-United States Department of Agriculture

Canada-Health Canada

Universities in Asia

China Agricultural University

Zhejiang University

Jiangnan University

Nanjing Agricultural University

South China University of Technology

Northwest A&F University - China

University Putra Malaysia

National Taiwan University

Eoul National University

University of Tehran

National Chung Hsing University

Huazhong Agricultural University

China Wuhan, Hubei

University of Tokyo

China Medical University Taiwan

Taiwan Taichung

Kyoto University

society in Asia

The parental and enteral nutrition society of asia(PENSA)

Asia pacific clinical nutrition society

International Union of Nutritional Sciences

      Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
           
      National Institute of Nutrition
       
       Federation of Asian Nutrition Societies (FANS)
         
       Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR)
   
       World Health Organisation (WHO, International, India)
 

Research institution in Asia

Australia-National Health and Medical Research Council

Bangladesh-Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders

China-Chinese Nutrition Society

Fiji-National Food and Nutrition Centre, Ministry of Health

India-National Institute of Nutrition

Japan-Japan Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Food Safety and Consumer Affairs Bureau

Malaysia-Ministry of Health

Mongolia-Nutrition Research Department, Ministry of Health

Nepal-Ministry of Health and Population

New Zealand-Ministry of Health

Philippines-Food and Nutrition Research Institute- Department of Science and Technology

Republic of Korea-Health Industry Development Institute

Sri Lanka-Nutrition Division, Ministry of Health

Thailand-Bureau of Nutrition, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health

Viet Nam-National Institute on Nutrition

Universitis in Europe

Wageningen University and Research Centre

Netherlands Wageningen

Ghent University

Belgium Gent

Aarhus University

Denmark Aarhus C

University Hohenheim

Germany Stuttgart

KU Leuven

Belgium Leuven

University of Copenhagen

Denmark Copenhagen

Society in Europe

FenS (Federation of European Nutrition Societies)

Society of nutrition and food science

EUFIC

IUNS(International union of nutritional sciences

Research instituton in Europe

Albania-Ministry of Health

Austria-Ministry of Health

Belgium-Federal Public Service Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment

Bosnia and Herzegovina-Institute of Public Health of Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina

Croatia-Ministry of Health

Cyprus-   Ministry of Health

Denmark-Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries

Estonia-National Institute for Health Development

Finland-National Nutrition Council

France-Ministry of Health

Georgia-National Centre for Disease Control and Public Health

Germany-German Nutrition Society

Greece- National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine - WHO Collaborating Center for Food and Nutrition Policies

Hungary-National Institute for Food and Nutrition Science

Iceland-The Directorate of Health

Ireland- Department of Health

Israel-Ministry of Health

Italy-Research Centre on Food and Nutrition

Latvia-Ministry of Health

Malta-The Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Directorate, Parliamentary Secretariat for Health

Netherlands-Netherlands Nutrition Centre

Norway -Directorate of Health

Poland -National Food and Nutrition Institute Portugal-Faculty of Food Sciences and Nutrition, Porto University

Romania-National Food and Nutrition Committee, Ministry of Health

Slovenia-National Institute of Public Health

Spain-  Spanish Agency For Consumer Affairs, Food Safety and Nutrition

Switzerland-Federal Food Safety and Veterinary Office

Swiss -Society for Nutrition 

The former -Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia-Institute of Public Health

Turkey-Ministry of Health

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland-National Health Service

Research instituion in Middle east

Iran-Ministry of Health and Medical Education

Oman-Ministry of Health

Qatar-Supreme Council of Health

Universities in Middle east

American University in Cairo 

Cairo University

 Ain Shams University

Alexandria University

Mansoura U niversity

Universities in Israel

Hebrew University of Jerusale

Technion-Israel Institute of Technology

 el Aviv University

American University of Beirut (AUB) 

Université Saint-Joseph de Beyrouth (USJ)

 Universities in Qatar

Universities in Saudi Arabia

King Saud University

Why Las Vegas, Nevada?:-

Unhealthy eating and physical inactivity are leading causes of death in the U.S.  diet contributes to approximately 678,000 deaths each year in the U.S., due to nutrition- and obesity-related diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, and type 2 diabetes.1 In the last 30 years, obesity rates have doubled in adults, tripled in children, and quadrupled in adolescents.

Research clearly shows that the federal nutrition programs do not contribute to the current obesity crisis in the U.S. (Fan & Jin, 2015; Gleason et al., 2009; Hofferth & Curtin, 2005; Linz et al., 2004; ver Ploeg, 2009; ver Ploeg et al., 2008). In fact, by both improving dietary intake and reducing food insecurity, participation in the federal nutrition programs plays a critical role in obesity prevention. For this reason, public health and nutrition experts recommend increasing participation in the federal nutrition programs to promote healthy eating and prevent obesity (Institute of Medicine, 2009; Institute of Medicine, 2011; White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity, 2010).Participation in the federal nutrition programs improves dietary intake, which is critical in combating the current obesity problem. Consider the following selection of recent findings:School meal participants are less likely to have nutrient inadequacies and are more likely to consume fruit, vegetables, and  breakfast and lunch (Clark & Fox, 2009; Condon et al., 2009).Low-income students who eat both school breakfast and lunch have significantly better overall diet quality than low-income students who do not eat school meals (Hanson & Olson, 2013).The new school meal nutrition standards are having a positive impact on student food selection and consumption, especially for fruits and vegetables (Cohen et al., 2014; Cullen et al., 2015; Schwartz et al., 2015).Packed lunches brought from home by pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students have more calories, fat, saturated fat, and sugar than school lunches, and less protein, fibre, vitamin A, and calcium, according to a study conducted after implementation of the new school meal nutrition standards (Farris et al., 2014).

Few packed lunches and snacks brought from home meet National School Lunch Program standards and Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) afterschool snack standards, respectively (Caruso & Cullen, 2015; Hubbard et al., 2014).

Children in afterschool programs consume more calories, salty foods, and sugary foods on days they bring their own snack than on days they only eat the afterschool snack provided through the National School Lunch Program or CACFP (Kenney et al., 2014).

Child care sites participating in CACFP, especially Head Start centers, serve more fruits, vegetables, and milk, and fewer sweetened beverages, sweets, and snack foods than non-participating child care sites (Ritchie et al., 2012).

Projections: Growth by next 5 years In Food and Nutrition:-

Global progress in improving human nutrition will continue, but in numerical terms it will be slow. Even by 2030, hundreds of millions of poor people will remain under-nourished unless local food production is given higher priority and inequality of access to food is reduced. However, the lower incidence of undernourishment will make the problem more tractable through national and international policy interventions.progress in nutrition have been significant.

Freedom from hunger is not only a basic human right: it is essential for the full enjoyment of other rights, such as health, education and work, and everything that flows from these.The world has made significant progress in raising nutrition levels over the past three decades. These levels are most commonly measured in terms of kilocalories per person per day. People in developing countries need between 1 720 and 1 960 kcal per day for basal metabolism and light activity.World average food consumption per person has risen by almost a fifth, from 2 360 kcal per person per day in the mid-1960s to 2 800 kcal per person per day today. The gains in the world average reflect predominantly those of the developing countries, given that the industrial and transition economies had fairly high levels of food consumption already in the mid-1960s. Over the period to 1997-99, average daily per capita food consumption in developing countries rose from 2 050 kcal to 2 680 kcal (see Annex Table A3).The proportion of the world's population living in countries with low average food energy intakes has declined dramatically. In the mid-1960s, no less than 57 percent were living in countries with average intakes below 2 200 kcal per day. India and China both came into this category. By 1997-99, although world population had almost doubled to nearly six billion, this proportion had fallen to just 10 percent. Even the absolute numbers - which decline more slowly because of population growth - fell by over two-thirds, from 1 890 million to 570 million.At the other extreme, the share of the world's population living in countries with average food energy intakes above 2 700 kcal per person per day has more than doubled, from 30 percent to 61 percent. Rapid gains in some of the largest developing countries, including China, Brazil, Indonesia and Nigeria, account for much of this progress. India, however, has yet to move into this category.Over this same period, world annual consumption of cereals for both food and feed has doubled to 1.9 billion tonnes, while that of meat has more than doubled - no mean achievement considering popular fears that the world was running out of potential to increase production. The main forces driving this achievement have included higher in-comes, which have increased effective demand, increased supplies, owing to improvements in productivity, and the growth of trade and transport links, which have allowed food deficits in some areas to be covered by surpluses from other areas.Yet hundreds of millions remain undernourishedThis remarkable achievement has nevertheless left out a massive number of people, who continue to fare badly. In 1997-99 there were still 777 million undernourished people in developing countries - about one person in six. This represents only a modest decline from the figure of 816 million for 1990-92.In China, huge reductions in poverty raised national average food consumption substantially - and this had a strong effect on the global picture. If China is removed from the picture, it becomes clear that the number of under-nourished people actually increased in the other developing countries, by almost 40 million.In 1997-99 there were still 777 million undernourished people in developing countries - about one person in six.The region with the largest number of undernourished people in 1997-99 was South Asia, where 303 million or just under a quarter of the population remained undernourished. The region with the highest proportion was sub-Saharan Africa, where over a third of the total population, or 194 million people, were undernourished.In 1997-99, some 30 developing countries still had average per capita food consumption of below 2 200 kcal per day. War and civil strife were significant factors in no less than half of these countries. In most of them, food consumption today stands at levels below those attained in the past. Some 23 of the 30 are in sub-Saharan Africa, while only 7 are in other regions.Populations and incomes will continue to growFuture food consumption patterns are deter-mined by growth in population and in incomes, and by changes in dietary preferences.The latest projections by the United Nations (UN) show a continuing slowdown in the growth of the world's population. In the medium UN projection, the 6.1 billion people of 2000 will grow to 7.2 billion in 2015 and 8.3 billion in 2030, heading towards 9.3 billion in 2050.Global progress in nutrition: energy intake levels by percentage of the world's population, 1964-66 and 1997-9Perceptions of a continuing population explosion are false. In fact it is more than 30 years since the world passed its peak population growth rate, of 2.04 percent a year, in the late 1960s. Since then the growth rate has fallen to 1.35 percent. This is expected to fall further to 1.1 percent in the period 2010 to 2015 and to 0.8 percent in 2025 to 2030. There will be a corresponding slowdown in the growth of demand for food.The absolute numbers added each year are also past their peak of 86 million a year, reached in the late 1980s. Even so, current annual additions of around 77 million still amount to almost a new Germany each year. The yearly increments will taper off only slowly during the study period: even by the period 2025 to 2030 they will still be running at 67 million a year. It is only by the middle of the century that these increments will have fallen significantly, to 43 million per year in 2045 to 2050. Almost all of these increases will be in the developing countries.By 2030 there will be substantial differences in population growth rates among the developing countries. While East Asia's population will be growing at only 0.4 percent a year, that of sub-Saharan Africa will still be growing at 2.1 percent. By 2030, every third person added to the world's population will be a sub-Saharan African. By 2050, this will rise to every second person.The second major factor determining the demand for food is growth in incomes. The latest World Bank assessment of future economic growth is less optimistic than its predecessors, but it still projects a rise of 1.9 percent a year in per capita incomes between 2000 and 2015, higher than the 1.2 percent seen in the 1990s.What will happen to the incidence of poverty under this overall economic scenario is of great importance to food security because poverty and hunger are closely associated. The World Bank has estimated the implications of its economic growth projections for poverty reduction by the year 2015. They are that:

•  It is possible to achieve the goal of halving the proportion of people living in absolute poverty - defined as an income below US$1 per day - by 2015, over the 1990 level.

•  However, it is unlikely that the number of poor people can also be halved. This will decline from 1.27 billion in 1990 to 0.75 billion in 2015.

• Much of the decline will be due to development in East and South Asia. Indeed, about half of the decline of 400 million projected for East Asia has already occurred.

•Only in sub-Saharan Africa, where incomes are expected to grow very slowly, are the numbers living in poverty expected to rise, from 240 million in 1990 to 345 million in 2015. By then, two out of five people in the region will be living in poverty.Average nutrition will improve, but under-nourishment will fall only slowlyIn the light of these changes in population and incomes, progress in improving nutrition is expected to continue, though more slowly than in the past. Average per capita food consumption in developing countries is projected to rise by 6.3 percent, from 2 680 kcal in 1997-99 to 2 850 kcal in 2015. This is a third of the rise achieved between 1974-76 and 1997-99.The slowdown is occurring not because of production limits but because many countries have now reached medium to high levels of consumption, beyond which there is less scope than in the past for further increases. Huge countries such as China, where per capita consumption rose from 2 050 kcal per day in the mid-1970s to over 3 000 kcal per day today, have already passed the phase of rapid growth. More and more countries will be attaining such levels over the projection period.

Conclusion:-

The more we eat healthy, the less natural it feels to reach for a piece of cookie or a bag of chips when we get hungry. It is then not a matter of depriving ourselves or forcing ourselves, but simply a conscious recognition of respecting what feels the best for our body in the long-term run.When we eat healthy, we physically feel good. We mentally have more energy to do the things that matter. When we are both globally conscious and personally healthy in our eating choices, we are contributing to the welfare of the planet. Our decision to practice healthy eating habits has so many consequences in so many ways.

Now that you have all the information you need on eating healthy, the most important action step you can do is to maintain this lifestyle choice as much as possible. Post intents when you need motivation from others. Keep a diary of your food choices on your blog or journal. Talk to other people when you are feeling tempted to indulge in unhealthy desserts.

Eating healthy, after all, is not about losing your ability to enjoy indulgences. It is a matter of gaining so many things that will affect you for the rest of your life: a longer life, the ability to enjoy natural foods, a wholesome sense of self-esteem and the joy of respecting your body for all that it does for you.Populations and incomes will continue to growFuture food consumption patterns are deter-mined by growth in population and in incomes, and by changes in dietary preferences.The latest projections by the United Nations (UN) show a continuing slowdown in the growth of the world's population. In the medium UN projection, the 6.1 billion people of 2000 will grow to 7.2 billion in 2015 and 8.3 billion in 2030, heading towards 9.3 billion in 2050.Global progress in nutrition: energy intake levels by percentage of the world's population, 1964-66 and 1997-9Perceptions of a continuing population explosion are false. In fact it is more than 30 years since the world passed its peak population growth rate, of 2.04 percent a year, in the late 1960s. Since then the growth rate has fallen to 1.35 percent. This is expected to fall further to 1.1 percent in the period 2010 to 2015 and to 0.8 percent in 2025 to 2030. There will be a corresponding slowdown in the growth of demand for food.

The absolute numbers added each year are also past their peak of 86 million a year, reached in the late 1980s. Even so, current annual additions of around 77 million still amount to almost a new Germany each year. The yearly increments will taper off only slowly during the study period: even by the period 2025 to 2030 they will still be running at 67 million a year. It is only by the middle of the century that these increments will have fallen significantly, to 43 million per year in 2045 to 2050. Almost all of these increases will be in the developing countries.

By 2030 there will be substantial differences in population growth rates among the developing countries. While East Asia's population will be growing at only 0.4 percent a year, that of sub-Saharan Africa will still be growing at 2.1 percent. By 2030, every third person added to the world's population will be a sub-Saharan African. By 2050, this will rise to every second person.The second major factor determining the demand for food is growth in incomes. The latest World Bank assessment of future economic growth is less optimistic than its predecessors, but it still projects a rise of 1.9 percent a year in per capita incomes between 2000 and 2015, higher than the 1.2 percent seen in the 1990s.What will happen to the incidence of poverty under this overall economic scenario is of great importance to food security because poverty and hunger are closely associated. The World Bank has estimated the implications of its economic growth projections for poverty reduction by the year 2015. They are that:

Reference:-

  • http://www.ibisworld.com/industry/nutritionists-dietitians.html
  • http://www.strategyr.com/MarketResearch/Sports_and_Fitness_Nutrition_Supplements_Market_Trends.asp(global industry analyst)
  • Global Nutrition and Supplements Market: History, Industry Growth, and Future Trends by PMR(https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2015/01/27/700276/10117198/en/Global-Nutrition-and-Supplements-Market-History-Industry-Growth-and-Future-Trends-by-PMR.html)

 

Past Conference Report

Food Technology-2015

Food Technology-2015 Report

Food Technology-2015 Past Conference Report

OMICS International successfully hosted the 4tInternational Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology during August 10-12, 2015 at Crowne Plaza Heathrow, London, UK. The essence of the conference was mainly based on the theme “Food Technology: Trends and Strategies for Innovation of Sustainable Foods”. The conference was successful in gathering eminent speakers from various reputed organizations and their paramount talks enlightened the gathering.

Food Technology-2015 was marked by the attendance of Editorial Board Members of supported Journals like Journal of Food Processing & Technology, Fermentation Technology and Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences. Many Scientists, young and brilliant Researchers, Business Delegates and talented Student Communities representing more than 30 countries made this conference fruitful and productive driving the three-day event into the path of success with thought provoking keynote and plenary presentations.

The 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology covered the following scientific sessions and discussions:

  • Breaking Innovations in Food Science World
  • Food Safety, Preservation, Quality Standard and Systems Management
  • Food Processing and Packaging Technologies
  • Nutrition and Nutritional Management
  • Food and Public Health
  • Application of Food Technology
  • Nutritional Deficiencies and Nutraceuticals
  • Sustainable Food Security
  • Food Nanotechnology
  • Food Biotechnology

During the above mentioned sessions, there were several eminent speakers who presented enlightening and informative parlances in the International Workshops & Symposia of the Food Technology-2015 as below:

  • Malcolm Elliott, from The Norman Borlaug Institute for Global Food Security, UK, delivered a lecture on “Food safety, security and sustainability: The 21st century challenge”.
  • Christopher Smith, from MMU, UK & Sergei Eremin, from Moscow State University, Russia, together enlightened the attendees on the topic “AgriFood antibodies - Immunoassays for food safety and quality control”.
  • Gabriela Riscuta, from National Cancer Institute, USA, talked about “Fermented food and possible health consequences”.
  • Michael O’Mahony, from University of California, USA, clarified on the “Illusions, misperceptions and false food preferences caused by the brain”.
  • Ozlem Tokusoglu, from Celal Bayar University, Turkey, gave and insightful rendition on “Folic acid (B9) fortification strategies by innovative microencapsulation”.
  • Mirjana Menkovska, from Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Macedonia, presented the topic of “Cereal dietary fibre perspectives on sustainable food and nutrition”.
  • Ian Watson, from University of Glasgow, UK, gave an educative explanation on “Real time detection of bacteria for improved decontamination for the food industry”.

Food Technology-2015 also comprised of three International Pre-conference Workshops as mentioned below:

  • Pre-conference workshop on “Innovative technologies for advanced food processing and nutrition towards better health” during May 29-30, 2015 at Congress Center, Ohrid under the supervision of Dr. Mirjana Menkovska, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Macedonia.
  • Pre-conference workshop on “Innovation and safety of foods and beverages” during June 2-3, 2015 at Congress Center of Technological Educational Institute of Athens under the guidance of Dr. John Tsaknis, Dean of the Faculty of Food Technology and Nutrition, TEI of Athens, Greece.
  • Pre-conference workshop on “Frontiers in food science for feeding the world” on June 15, 2015 at Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, Italy by Dr. Francesca Venturi and Dr. Angela Zinnai, Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, Italy.

We congratulate our winners of the Poster Competition

  • Woo Duck Seo, Crop Foundation Division, Republic of Korea
  • Beste Bayramoglu, Izmir Institute of Technology, Turkey
  • Hee Do Hong, Korea Food Research Institute, Korea
  • Selen Guner, Middle East Technical University, Turkey

We also would like to congratulate the winner of Young Research Forum, Abdulmannan Fadel, from MMU, UK, which was sponsored by Aggelakis S. A., Greece.

We would like to sincerely thank our Scientific Advisor Prof. M. S. Swaminathan (First World Food Laureate, 1987) and our Conference Chair Dr. Ozlem Tokusoglu, Celal Bayer University, Turkey and Conference Co-Chair Dr. Christopher Smith, University of Chester, UK, for their remarkable contribution towards the smooth functioning of Food Technology-2015. We are obliged to the various delegate experts, institutes and other eminent personalities who actively took part in the discussion and meetings.

We extend our special thanks to the Hellenic Association of Food Technologists, Greece and The Association of Food Technology, Turkey, for their support in accomplishing this event successfully.

With the feedback from the participants and supporters of Food Technology-2015OMICS International is glad to announce 15th International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology (Food Technology - 2016) during November 07-09, 2016 in Istanbul, Turkey.


Past Reports  Proceedings  Gallery  

Food Technology-2014
Food Technology-2014 Report

OMICS Group Conferences successfully hosted its premier 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology during July 21-23, 2014 at Hampton Inn Tropicana, Las Vegas, USA.

This World congress was accomplished by the support of American Celiac Society, USA and Louisiana State University, USA. Food Technology -2014 marked with the attendance of Editorial Board Members of supported OMICS Group Journals, Scientists, young and brilliant researchers, business delegates and talented student communities representing more than 25 countries, who made this conference fruitful and productive.

This 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology was based on the theme “Accelerating new research and innovations in Food Processing and Technology” which has covered the below scientific sessions:

·         Frontiers in Food Science

·         Breaking Innovations in Food and Beverage

·         Food Safety, Food Preservation, Quality Standard and Food Systems Management

·         Food Physical Chemistry

·         Food Processing and Packaging Technologies

·         Current and Future Applications of Probiotic Science

·         Nutrition and Nutritional Management

·         Food and Public Health

·         Industrial Application of Food Technology

·         Nutritional Deficiencies and Nutraceuticals

·         Food Regulatory Affairs and Sensory Analysis

·         Instrumentation in Food Technology

·         Current Trends in Food Technology

·         Food Security and Food Policy

·         Agricultural Biotechnology

·         Fermentation Technology, Bioprocess and Cell Culture

The conference was greeted by the welcome message of honorable Congress Chair Dr.Daniel Y C Fung, Kansas State University, USA and moderated by Annette C Bentley, American Celiac Society, USA.  The support was extended by the honorable guest Ozlem Tokusoglu, Celal Bayar University, Turkey; Gabriela Riscuta,  National Cancer Institute, USA; Mirjana Menkovska, Sts. Cyril and Methodius University, Macedonia and Claus MussInternational Research Group for Preventive Medicine, Austria and below keynote lectures:

  • Improved food preservation and shelf life stability by ultrasound processing technologies: Case studies, Ozlem Tokusoglu, Celal Bayar University, Turkey
  • Fermented dairy products in cancer risk and prevention, Gabriela Riscuta, National Cancer Institute, USA
  • Sugar and fat how bad is that?, Alison Burton Shepherd, King’s College London, UK
  • High intense-sweeteners: An overview of non-nutritive (artificial) sweeteners used to reduce calories, Osama Ibrahim, BioInnovation, USA
  • Clinical assessment of nutraceuticals in Europe by EFSA, Claus Muss, International Research Group of Applied Preventive Medicine, Austria

OMICS Group International acknowledges the support of below Chairs and Co-chairs for whom we were able to run smoothly the scientific sessions which includes: Osama Ibrahim, BioInnovation, USA; Modesto Olanya, FSIT-ERRC-ARS-USDA, USA;  Mirjana Menkovska, Sts. Cyril and Methodius University, Macedonia; Alison Burton Shepherd, King’s College London, UK; John Tsaknis, Technological Educational Institution of Athens, Greece; Claus Muss, International Research Group of Applied Preventive Medicine, Austria; Tong Zhao, University of Georgia, USA and Angela Zinnai, University of Pisa, Italy.

The Food Technology-2014 also being highlighted for the below International Workshops:

  • Rapid methods and automation in microbiology: Past, present and future by Daniel Y C Fung, Kansas State University, USA.
  • Functional and innovative food quality & processing by Ozlem Tokusoglu, Celal Bayar University, Turkey.
  • Antimicrobial activity of lactic acid bacteria on pathogens in foods by Dilek Heperkan, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey.

The Food Technology-2014 also being highlighted for the below international Symposiums:

  • Bio-control & antimicrobials for sustainable control of food-borne pathogens - Are we there yet? by Dike O Ukuku, FSIT-ERRC-ARS-USDA, USA and Modesto Olanya, FSIT-ERRC-ARS-USDA, USA.
  • Combining technologies for food decontamination and extending the shelf life of fruit and vegetables by Ian WatsonUniversity of Glasgow, UK.
  • Wheat technological quality in relation with the composition of gluten proteins-gliadins and HMW glutenins by Mirjana Menkovska, Sts. Cyril and Methodius University, Macedonia.
  • Microalgae as a sustainable food source by Ian Watson, University of Glasgow, UK.

This 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology uplifted with more than 50 poster presentations by researchers, students, professors, industry delegates around 20 countries across the globe.

OMICS Group International has taken the privilege of felicitating Food Technology-2014 Organizing Committee Members, Editorial Board Members of the supported Journals and Keynote Speakers who supported for the success of this event and special privilege to Louisiana State University, USA for providing Continuing Education credits to all the participants.

Food Technology-2014 is known for uplifting the future of Food Processing by encouraging students and fellow researchers to present their work through Poster Presentations and Young Research Forum. Students participated with great zeal and the best posters were awarded for their efforts and outstanding contribution to the food science research. The best poster awardees were: Olga Gortzi, Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Thessaly, Greece; Tae-Young Kang, Sejong University, Korea; Santiago Gallegos-Tintore, Autonomous University of Yucatan, Mexico; Hiroko Seki, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Japan; Hyun-Joo Jo, Chung-Ang University, Korea and Mun Yhung Jung, Woosuk University, Republic of Korea. The best Young Research Forum (YRF) awardees were: Emma Loughrill, University of Greenwich, UK; Manuel Krewinkel, University of Hohenheim, Germany; Moras Benjamin, Université de Toulouse, France and Debolina Ghosh, Hathaway Brown School, USA.

We are also thankful to the following exhibitors for their participation and interactive sessions:

  • ACO Polymers, USA
  • QualySense AG, Switzerland

Last but not the least OMICS Group International Conferences wishes to acknowledge with its deep sincere gratitude to all the supporters from  the Editorial Board Members of our Open Access Journals, Keynote speakers, Honorable guests, Valuable speakers, Poster presenters, students, delegates and special thanks to the Media partners and Collaborators for their promotion to make this event a huge success.

With the enormous feedback from the participants and supporters of 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology, OMICS Group Conferences is glad to announce its 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology (Food Technology-2015) from August 10-12, 2015 at London, UK.


Past Reports  Proceedings  Gallery  

Food Technology-2013
Food Technology-2013 Report

With the trail of success of the previous conference, OMICS Group hosted the 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology (Food Technology-2013) during October 28-30, 2013 at Kansas City Marriott Country Club Plaza, Kansas City, USA with the theme Breaking new frontiers through automation and innovation and developing sustainable products”.  Benevolent response and active participation was received from the Editorial Board Members of OMICS Group Journals as well as from the scientists, engineers, researchers, students and leaders from the fields of food processing and nutrition science, who made this event successful.

The meeting was carried out through various sessions, in which the discussions were held on the following 10 thought provoking and cerebrating scientific tracks:

  • Nutrition, Food Processing & Food Management
  • Nutritional Deficiencies & Disorders
  • Food Preservation and Quality Control
  • Food Technology Applications
  • Agri-Biotechnology
  • Food Processing Industriest
  • Food Processing and Engineering
  • Food Security and Challenges
  • Food Regulatory Affairs
  • Current Research in Food Science and Technology

The conference was embarked with an opening ceremony followed by a series of lectures delivered by both Honorable Guests and members of the Keynote forum. The honorable guests of Food Technology-2013 include Dike O. Ukuku USDA ARS-Eastern Regional Research Center, USA; Mirjana Menkovska UKIM Institute of Animal Science, Macedonia; Florian M. Wurm Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Switzerland; Z. Lewis Liu USDA ARS-Eastern Regional Research Center, USA. The conference was initiated with a series of invited lectures delivered by the members of the keynote forum including Dike O. Ukuku USDA ARS-Eastern Regional Research Center, USA; Mirjana Menkovska UKIM Institute of Animal Science, Macedonia; Florian M. Wurm Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Switzerland; Ganapathy Sivakumar Arkansas State University, USA; Motoharu Uchida Fisheries Research Agency, Japan.

All the above mentioned Honorable Guests, keynote speakers and other speakers gave their energetic and rewarding contributions at Food Technology-2013.

Food Technology-2013 was comprised of two symposiums and one workshop. The adepts who promulgated the symposium and workshop with their exquisite talk were:

  • Workshop by Annette C. Bentley, American Celiac Society, USA
    (Title: Development of specialty foods, current problems & searching for corrections)
  • Symposium by Karen E. Burke, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, USA
    (Title: Topical antioxidants for protection and reversal of environmental damage)
  • Symposium by Dike O. Ukuku, USDA ARS-Eastern Regional Research Center, USA
    (Title: Microbial safety of minimally processed produce and fresh-cut fruits)

The most interesting part of Food Technology-2013 was award winning Poster Presentation competition. Ranging from young budding researchers to Professors were actively participated in this prestigious competition. The winners of best poster award were:

  • Ester Mpand Khosa
  • Oladayo Adeyi
  • Cristina Chairez Jimenez
  • Motoharu Uchida

OMICS Group International offers its heartfelt appreciation to organization such as American Celiac Society, and is also obliged to the Organizing Committee Members, adepts of field, various outside experts, company representatives and other eminent personalities who interlaced with OMICS group in supporting and making the conference as never before one.

Your rejoinder is our inspiration, keeping this motto in mind and being witnessed the triumph of Food Technology-2013, OMICS Group is delighted to announce the next event.  Mark your calendars for the upcoming extravaganza, “3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology" to be held during July 21-23, 2014 at Hampton Inn Tropicana, Las Vegas, USA.


Past Reports  Gallery  

To Collaborate Scientific Professionals around the World

Conference Date May 22-24, 2017

Speaker Opportunity

Day 1 Day 2 Day 3

Supported By

Journal of Food Processing & Technology Journal of Food: Microbiology, Safety & Hygiene Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences

All accepted abstracts will be published in respective Conferenceseries International Journals.

Abstracts will be provided with Digital Object Identifier by


What People Say....

It was a pleasure for me to participate.

Speaker

Suzana Caetano da Silva Lannes
President, Brazilian Society of Food Science and Technology
Brazil

It was a pleasure for me to attend, to give a speech and to know interesting.

Speaker

Alexander V Sirotkin
Professor, Constantine the Philosopher University
Slovakia

I am glad, i was there. I learned a lot. Great experience.

Speaker

Ingegerd Rosborg
Professor, KTH Royal Institue of Technology
Sweden

Many great speakers on cutting edge research.

Speaker

Siripong Malasri
Christian Brothers University
USA

Interesting presentation & worthful spirit of exchange of experience!!

Speaker

Chiara Sanmartin
University of Pisa
Italy

Thank you for offering an unforgettable experience for all of us. We are honored to attend the conference. We are so happy and thanks a lot.

Speaker

Zengqi Peng
Professor, Nanjing Agriculture University
China