Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 17th International Conference on Food & Nutrition Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

Day 2 :

Food & Nutrition 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Markandeya Jois photo
Biography:

Markandeya Jois has expertise in the prevention and treatment of obesity and metabolic syndrome. His research in this area employs animal models as well as clinical trials with particular emphasis on the role of food plants in disease prevention

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: One of the contributing factors for the current epidemic of obesity is the increased consumption of added sugar in the diet. Sugarcane accounts for 80% of the sugar production. Molasses, a byproduct of sugar production from sugarcane, is known rich in many bioactive compounds including flavonoids and phenylpropanoids. Here we show that inclusion of molasses in a high fat, high sugar diet protects mice from developing obesity. Methods: Thirty-six 6-wk old male mice were assigned to one of 3 groups. Each group was fed either a high fat, high sugar diet (HFC), a HFC diet containing 10% molasses replacing 5% sugar and 5% cellulose (Mol-Sugar) or a HFC diet containing 10% molasses replacing 5% starch and 5% cellulose (Mol-Starch). Mice were maintained on these diets for 14 weeks and food intake and bodyweights were monitored weekly. At weeks 7 and 14, randomly selected mice were culled and body composition, plasma metabolites and tissue gene expression were measured Findings: Molasses groups gained significantly less bodyweight and had lower body fat. The effects of molasses on body fat content was greater in the Mol-Sugar group. Reduced body fat in the molasses groups were associated with an up-regulation of SIK2 gene expression and a down-regulation of ATF3 gene expression in adipose tissue. Circulating adiponectin levels were also elevated in the molasses groups. Conclusion & Significance: Sugarcane molasses contain anti-obesity compounds and addition of these compounds to sugar containing food products may help prevent the development of obesity. 

Keynote Forum

Cyril E Broderick

Delaware State University, USA

Keynote: Innovative prospective among promising species of C3, C4 and CAM plants

Time : 10:40-11:10

Food & Nutrition 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Cyril E Broderick photo
Biography:

Cyril E Broderick is a plant scientist with experience in academics and in industry, He is a graduate of the University of Liberia (B.Sc.), Iowa State University (M.Sc.), and the University of New Hampshire (Ph.D.) He served as Manager for Botanical Research at Firestone in Liberia, and he has been teaching plant physiology and conducting research in photosynthesis and with capsaicin and other secondary compounds in plants. 

Abstract:

Wheat, rice, and corn are predominant food crop species and excellent producers of carbohydrates as food grains and feed crops. Legumes dominate as sources of plant amino acids and proteins. Soybeans and corn are notable as good sources of oils, and complementary food sources globally include the oil palm, potato, and cassava. Less than ten crops dictate world food diets, and the question is: Can we do better in exploiting plant diversity in providing nutritional requirements for Earth’s populace. Examination of the diversity of plant species as food sources in providing primary and secondary compounds for human nutrition and animal feedstuff is our objective. Through field, greenhouse and laboratory experiments, investigations continue in evaluating the wide diversity of plants, noting that environmental features that are most determining to productive capacities of crop species. Water and light availability and temperature are influential in making different environments arable. Moreover, the distinguishing features of C3, C4, and CAM plants enable scientists to evaluate potentials of these diverse species. Corn, a C4 plant, is now widely recognized for its efficiency in light and water use, tolerance to higher temperatures, and predominance as an efficient grain producer. Advantageously, C4 plants do not carry out photorespiration, and there are a few C4 species, especially the millets, which are nutritious and widely consumed in small populations. CAM species are fewer in number to consider, but the pineapple plant is one food crop that promotes the potential of this group. Many C3 species, including rice and wheat, nevertheless, produce food and nutritional compounds copiously in diverse environments. The productivity of vegetables, fruits, and spices, (typically C3 species) and their manufacture of alkaloids, terpenoids, and phenolics is nutritionally complementary, for neither C4 nor CAM plants match the diversity in productivity of C3 species.

Break: 11:10-11:25-Networking & Refreshment Break
  • Special Session
Location: Las Vegas

Session Introduction

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Time : 12:30-13:30

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Break: 13:30 -14:30-Lunch Break
  • Oral Session
Location: Las Vegas
Speaker

Chair

Markandeya Jois

La Trobe University, Australia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Cyril E Broderick

Delaware State University, USA

Speaker
Biography:

Benard Muinde Kimatu has been working on Bioactive molecules especially peptides since 2014. He has co-authored several articles with his colleagues at the Nanjing Agricultural University, China, under the leadership of Prof. Qiuhui Hu. Over the years he has gained experience in the generation of bioactive peptides from food protein sources, their purification and determination of their amino acid sequence and their possible application as functional foods and nutraceuticals. Before joining Prof. Hu’s laboratory he had been teaching at the Department of Dairy and Food Science and Technology, Egerton University, Kenya. 

Abstract:

In the recent years, attention has been directed towards enzymatic generation and use of bioactive peptides from food protein sources as natural antioxidants. Several reports have indicated that the activities of these peptides depend on the protein source, enzyme specificity, molecular weight, the degree of hydrolysis and amino acid composition. Agaricus bisporus (white button mushroom) is an edible fungus and the world’s leading cultivated mushroom with yields accounting for 70% of the total edible fungi. Several bioactivities from A. bisporus have been reported including ACE inhibitory activity, hypoglycaemic, antioxidant and antimicrobial. However, no reports have been made on the antioxidant potential of A. bisporus protein hydrolysate(s). In this study, A. bisporus mushroom protein isolate (MPI) was hydrolyzed using single (Alcalase, Pancreatin and Flavourzyme) and sequential (Alcalase-Pancreatin and Alcalase-Flavourzyme) enzymatic processes. The obtained hydrolysates (MPHs) were ultrafiltered to generate peptide fractions (UFs) of molecular sizes (<1, 1-3, 3-5 and 5-10 kDa). The electrophoretic profile results indicated that the enzymatic systems were efficient in hydrolyzing the MPI into low molecular weight peptides. Hydrolysate yields of >57% and protein recoveries of >43% were obtained. Effective concentration that scavenged 50% (EC50) of DPPH radicals was similar for the MPHs while   inhibition against linoleic acid oxidation was strongest (66.49%) for Alcalase-Flavourzyme hydrolysate on day 5 of incubation. UFs exhibited a concentration-dependent Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Property (FRAP), with the highest activity for fractions from Alcalase and Pancreatin recorded in 1-3 kDa. Considering the yield and the antioxidant activity, the Pancreatin 1-3 kDa fraction was also used in the DNA damage assay, where it demonstrated significant oxidative protection against damage induced by Fenton’s reagent. The antioxidant activities of MPHs and their UFs suggested that they could be potential bioactive ingredients for use in the formulation of functional foods as well as natural antioxidants in lipid food systems.

Ezeh Chidimma Francisca

Federal University of Technology, Nigeria

Title: Production and proximate analysis of zobo-tigernut drink (Tybo drink)

Time : 14:50-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

EZeh Chidinma  Francisca work with Federal university of Technology Owerri in Imo State, NIgeria as a laboratory Technologist. she have  B.SC and MSC in  Human Nutrition and Dietetics. she is a member of Nutrition society of NIgeria. She have so many publications in Local and International journals, such as the Nutrient Intake and Food consumpton pattern of women in  imo state published by international Journal of Gender and development issues Adequate nutrition a prerequisite for sustainable Development,Improving the outcome of pregnancy through nutrition Education, production and proximate analysis of zobo and tigenut drink tybo drink.

Abstract:

Beverages are essential for their thirst quenching function as well as their ability to provide nutrients especially the micro nutrients..That  is why there is a renewed interest  in  naturally  sourced  beverage   in  preference to  the artificially flavoured beverages .Zobo has a unigue taste that makes it pleasurable to  all classes of people in Nigeria .Tigernuts on the other hand are remarkably  nutrient dence, high  in  iron ,potassium zinc, phosphorus, vitamin E and C.This research was therefore carried out to produce a nutritious drink from blend of zobo and tigernuts.500grams of zobo  and tiger nuts were purchased, sorted and washed. Zobo drink was prepared by cooking and extraction .The tigernuts were washed ground and milk extracted. The blending was done using different  ratios of tigernuts juice/milk (100mils to 500mils 0f zobo,200mils of tigernuts to  500mils of zobo  etc).the sample that  was blended with 200mils of tigernuts was the best in colour  and taste and was selected for proximate analysis. The  proximate analysis carried out showed  that  the tybo  drink has 40.8 mg  of ascorbic acid, 6.6mg of calcium 2.4 gram of potassium 4.6 g of phosphorus 2.1gof sodium 5.4g of protein  and2.7g of fat. Developing a nutritious drink from zobo and  tigernuts will  help individuals meet their daily reguired  intake of micro nutrients.

Njenyuei Gideon Agho

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa

Title: Urban agriculture for sustainable livelihood: A case of migrant women in Johannesburg

Time : 15:10-15:30

Speaker
Biography:

Njenyuei Gideon Agho was awarded Post doctoral fellow from Faculty of Business & Economic Sciences, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa. He has extended his valuable service for many years and has been a recipient of many award and grants. His experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different events for diverse fields of study. His research interests reflect in his wide range of publications in various national and international journals.  

Abstract:

The objective of the research were to examine how urban agriculture contributes to the sustainable livelihood of migrants‟ women living in the inner city of Johannesburg, South Africa. The study focuses on the Cameroonian women community living in Turffontein. The study assesses the impact of urban agriculture on sustainable livelihood in the lives of Cameroonian women living in this suburb. It also examines the constraints encountered by these women in the practice of urban agriculture for sustainable livelihood. The study is based on a purposeful sample of Cameroonian migrants‟ women living in the inner city of Johannesburg practicing urban agriculture. It uses a mixed method of approach with a transect walk to the area where this women practice the urban agriculture. It also included an in-depth face to face interactive interview and written sources such as journals, books and research reports where combined to gather relevant data. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse the data. The findings of this study reveal that urban agriculture is used as a strategy for sustainable livelihood among several Cameroonian migrants‟ women in Turffontein. The study has also shown how through urban agriculture, these migrants‟ women have been able to raise substantial income to support their respective families both in South Africa and in Cameroon.
The study also show the need to facilitate a proactive programme that will support urban agriculture by low-income urban residents. And this can be done mostly through government policies and also through the municipal city’s review processes. The government should support the provisional use of urban farm projects and also encourage gardening in small spaces in the inner city of Johannesburg.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Amira-Liliana Rodríguez-Amayais full professor at the Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Alimentos of the Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Bogotá since 2008. Chemical Engineer specialized in Food Process Engineering and Biomaterials, with a PhD in Food Science and Technology and a Master's Degree in Agri-Food Engineering. He is the leader of the research group in Food Biomolecules. He has his research interests on the extraction and purification of bioactive molecules for their application in nutraceutical products and functional foods, as well as on the design of processes for a profitable utilization of food industry by-products. In the last five years, he has carried out research studies in the development of functional dairy products. Actually he is conducting a research project related to the design of functional foods for pregnant and nursing mothers and early childhood population, in which participates 10 graduate students in Food Science and Technology

Abstract:

Vitamin A and dietary fiber are nutrients of public health concern, because a deficiency in their consumption could increase the morbidity or mortality. Deficiency of vitamin A is a major problem in the child population of the developing countries. It is the main cause of the preventable childhood blindness, and contributes to various health problems during pregnancy and lactation. Moreover, the dietary fiber intake is still lower than that recommended by the FAO/WHO, although it is well known that it contributes to lowering the risk of weight gain, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and colon cancer, diseases that nowadays affect an important percentage of the world population.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the physicochemical and sensory properties of a Petit-Suisse fortified with carrot and fructo-oligosaccharides. Various concentrations of both functional ingredients were evaluated, in an effort to develop a product that could be labeled as “good source of vitamin A and dietary fiber”. The obtained products were characterized in terms of their proximate composition, pH, acidity, syneresis index, total fructans, color, texture, vitamin A, mineral content, and fatty acids composition during 28 days of storage at 4ºC. The sensory properties were evaluated with a trained panel, through the score tests. It was found that products elaborated with 35% carrot puree, and fructo-oligosaccharides at a concentration equivalent to 20% of the daily recommended intake, displayed adequate physicochemical and sensory properties.These results indicate that fortification of dairy products with vegetables and dietary fiber has high potential to improve the nutritional value and health promoting effects of the dairy goods, since they can enhance the intake of nutrients of public health concern. From the market point of view, this study contributes to the development of new value-added dairy products, as a response of the current consumers’ demands.
 

Kadam K N

Shri. Kumarswami College, India

Title: Effect of fish cultivation water on food grade of fishes

Time : 15:50-16:10

Speaker
Biography:

Kadam K N is working as Associate Professor in Zoology at Shri. Kumarswami College, Ausa Dist. Latur (INDIA). He was recipient of Gold medal at post graduation in 1997. He did his Ph.D. in 2002. He has 18 years of teaching experience to graduate students. He worked as Board of Study member at Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded. He has attended many national and international conferences. Till today he has published 8 research papers in national and international reputed journals.

Abstract:

Present investigation was carried out to study the effect of water quality on food quality of fishes. India is agriculture base country. Indian economy is mostly based on agricultural yield. In recent years due to global warming and al-neno effect, draught and heavy rainfall frequency is increased. Govt. of India monitoring these changes in the environment and government introduced various schemes including agricultural ponds.
Farmers of India were accepted the changed situations and in accordance with that agricultural ponds build by farmers. These ponds were used as water in crop culturing. Beside this fishes get cultured by farmers in agricultural ponds. From the present investigation it is concluded that the fishes which were cultured in agricultural pond coated by polythene, get grown rapidly and were less infected by parasites like cestodes. In this study fishes of natural water  body were get infected by cestodes mostly as compare to artificial ponds.
 

Break: 16:10-16:30-Networking & Refreshment Break,
Speaker
Biography:

Shaukat Hussain has completed his M. Sc. in Industrial Fishing at the age of 28 years from Astrakhan Technical University of Fisheries, Astrakhan, Ex-USSR (Russian Federation). Since then he worked in Marine Fisheries Department, Government of Pakistan, on different positions, and ultimately retired from the post of Director General on attaining the age of 60 years (retirement age) in November, 2015. Presently, he is working for M/K Pakistan (Pvt) Ltd, for development of new Fish Harbour in Gadani, as per the international food safety standards in the capacity of Managing Director.  During his tenure as Director General in above department his major achievements were: (i) resumption of export of FFP, in 2013, to the EU which was suspended in 2007; (ii) accreditation of testing laboratories under ISO / IEC – 17025:2005 international standards (iii); introduction of TEDs for local shrimp trawl-nets to satisfy the import requirement under section 609 of U.S. Public Law and clearance of inspection carried out by officials of OES and NOAA of United States of America  in 2014.  

Abstract:

Presently tuna and tuna like species are caught through large-sized wooden gill-netters employed in the EEZ of Pakistan and on the high seas. These gill-netters stay at sea from two (02) to four (04) weeks and bring back this high valued fish in such a deteriorated and un-wholesome condition that it fetches only 0.6 % of the price of the international market. A part from lack of proper preservation system on-board, the retention of net with entangled / gilled fish in water for around 15 to 20 hours has great contribution towards its spoilage. The second most important factor is that these drifting nets are major threat to oceanic pelagic ecosystem. Plenty of slack of netting between float-line and lead-line encourage entanglement of non-targeted species and marine mammals during fishing operations. Besides, the lost or discarded netting continue to act as “ghost fishing” for indefinite period of time which also entangle birds and marine mammals near the sea surface. Most of the data / information were collected from different sources which include statistical data published by Government departments, NGOs, fisheries organizations, interviewing skippers & crew of the boats, direct measurement of specification of net by the author, visits of fish landing sites and conducting sensory evaluation / organoleptic examination of landed catch, press media reports etc. The technical drawing of gill-net specifies the netting material, hanging ratio (E), mesh size, floatation etc. To build better understanding, the size of the typical boat and on-board facilities with examples of entanglement of non-targeted species as well as the impact on food safety are also provided. Way forward and recommendations:  Although Government has taken number of steps to reduce the overall length of the drift gill-net up to 2.5 km; however, it seems difficult as fishermen are not satisfied due to the reason that a net of only 2.5 km long is economically not feasible for such a large boats of more than 22m in overall length, having 22-25 crew on-board. Therefore, in order to achieve co-management (i.e. environmental protection and food safety), the alternate environmental friendly fishing methods or less destructive fishing gears & practices (like tuna long-liners) with on-board freezing facilities, will be very much welcomed by the fishermen as they will get best prices due to quality improvement. A pilot project focusing conversion of only 5-8 gill-netters into tuna long-liners will automatically attract the owners of fishing boats for conversion.

Speaker
Biography:

Habtamu Fekadu Gemede was awarded PhD in Food Technology from Wollega University, Ethiopia. He has extended his valuable service for many years and has been a recipient of many award and grants. Currently, he is working as a Professor at Wollega University, Ethiopia. His international experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different countries for diverse fields of study. His research interests reflect in his wide range of publications in various national and international journals.  

Abstract:

Eight okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) pod and seed accessions were evaluated for their antioxidant activities, total phenolics and total flavonoids content in order to find the possible sources of natural antioxidants. DDPH scavenging, reducing power, metal chelating and ABTS scavenging were performed to evaluate antioxidant activity. The results were compared with different synthetic antioxidants. The antioxidant levels of the pod and seed accessions increased with increasing concentration of the samples and were dependent on the extract concentration. The  EC50 values (mg/ml) of the pods and seeds of okra accession had respective ranges of DDPH scavenging 2.10-10.30 and 3.1->12; for reducing power were 1.20-4.20 and 1.18-4.30; for metal chelating were 0.50-1.52 and 0.32-1.11; for ABTS scavenging were 0.31-1.33 and 0.07-1.5. Okra pod and seed accessions had respective range of total phenol (mg GAE/g) 28.10-95.21 and 21.28-57.34; and for total flavonoid (mg CE/g) were 8.18-18.72 and 10.73-29.04. The study revealed that antioxidant activity, total phenolics and total flavonoid levels varied widely across pod and seed accessions, indicating their promising potential as a sources of natural antioxidants. Particularly, both okra pod and seed accession OPA#6 is a potential rich source of natural antioxidants than the rest of each accessions; that could be probably used in food preparations replacing synthetic antioxidants. Further studies are recommended to identify and quantify the available antioxidants.

Nayab Batool Rizvi

University of the Punjab, Pakistan

Title: Effect of frying on chemical quality of edible oils

Time : 17:10-17:30

Speaker
Biography:

Nayab Batool Rizvi has her expertise in Clinical Biochemistry. Her main area of interest is Biochemistry and Food and Nutrition. She has done a lot of work on antioxidants and currently working as an assistant professor in the Institute of Chemistry (Biochemistry Section) University of the Punjab, Lahore Pakistan. She has supervised more than 10 graduate and post graduate students and more than 5 M.phil students. Currently 3 Ph.d students are working under her supervision. 

Abstract:

Edible oils are widely used throughout the world.  Deep- fat frying is the most oldest and popular food preparation method around the globe.  The study is undertaken to observe Deep-fat frying phenomenon performed at high temperatures under atmospheric pressure. Deep frying results in deterioration of physical, chemical, nutritional and sensory properties of oil, which ultimately affects our health. It also results in the production of volatile products such as aldehydes and non-volatile fraction which remains in the frying medium. Some of these remaining products have been implicated in producing adverse health effects. Highly oxidized oils may also produce polyaromatic hydrocarbons, which have carcinogenic effect. This work was intended to evaluate the effect of frying on chemical properties of edible vegetable oils. Sunflower oil, olive oil and canola oil were used to fry French fries. Acid value, iodine value, peroxide value, saponification value and total polar compounds were measured by the standard ISO methods and traditional methods of determining these parameters. Acid values of all oils used were determined, that ranged between 0.3 to 28 (mg of KOH/g) but least value was of canola oil i.e 0.561. Similarly least iodine value is of fresh olive oil i.e 75.94 and the highest value was obtained in multiple times used sunflower oil. Peroxide value of canola oil was least i.e 4 (meqO2/kg) and the highest value was multiple times used canola oil. The results showed that  all these parameters in all the oil types increased linearly with frying time. The influence of oil type on the content of total polar compounds, peroxide and acid value in used oil was significant, but the effect of food type on these parameters was not observed.

Nachimuthu Varadharaju

Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, India

Title: Effect of de-hulling process on milling and nutritional quality of millets

Time : 17:30-17:50

Speaker
Biography:

Nachimuthu Varadharaju, Ph.D., is having expertise in reducing the post harvest losses in perishables for which he has contributed and established a Food Processing Business Incubator at the Post Harvest Technology Centre, TNAU, Coimbatore. His contributions in development of processing machinery are noteworthy to mention. He has operated three international and four national research projects. He was instrumental in design and development of double chamber centrifugal dehuller for millets, for which he was conferred with a national award. He has got three decades of teaching and research experience in the field of Food & Agricultural Process Engineering. He has supervised 12 doctoral and 25 Post Graduate students in the area of   Food Process Engineering. He has published 25 international and 40 National research papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Investigating the effect of parboiling on dehulling process and cooking qualities of millets. Millet grains are considered to be one of the most important sources of dietary proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and fibre for people all over the world.  The nutrient composition of millets compares well with other cereals. The tiny "grain" is gluten-free and contains nutrients such as magnesium, calcium, manganese, tryptophan, phosphorus, fibre and antioxidants. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: De-hulling of little millet (Panicum sumatrense) and foxtail millet  (Setaria italic)  is a cumbersome process  since husk and   bran   layers are  bound  tightly  on the endosperm and their removal needs a special treatment. To ease the milling process, these millets were subjected to hydrothermal treatment at different levels of soaking temperature (60, 70, 800C), soaking time (6, 7, 8h), steaming periods (10, 15, 20 min.) shade dried and milled in a centrifugal de-huller.  The milled samples were analysed for hulling efficiency, head rice recovery, degree of parboiling, hardness, colour, cooking time, water up take and swelling index using standard procedures. Increase in hulling efficiency (20.8 - 26.5%) was recorded over control in little millet and foxtail millet (20.5 – 25.3%) and the head rice recovery enhanced by 26.7% and 24.8 % in little millet and foxtail millet respectively over the range of experiments conducted. The increase in temperature of soaking, soaking time and steaming period increased the degree of parboiling, hardness  (30.8 – 34.2 N in little millet and 32.6-34.5 N in foxtail millet) and cooking time (10.4- 10.8 min.) for both millets. Water uptake and swelling index decreased appreciably due to hydrothermal treatment. The treated samples were dark in colour compared to raw grains and the change in L*, a*,b* values were highly significant. 

Anurag Varshney

Yuvraj Research Center Pvt Ltd, India

Title: Waste management after natural disaster

Time : 17:50-16:10

Speaker
Biography:

Anurag Varshney, Promoter of Yuvraj Research Center Pvt Ltd, is Innovator & Industrialist, who do Innovation and commercialized the product for Society’s benefit. Yuvraj Group of Company is running from 2008 and having 03 Branch in India & one R&D Center in Singapore. MBA Qualified, having rich and outstanding experience more than 18 years in R&D Innovation & Manufacturing of Prototype Equipments. He has completed more than 50 Innovated Prototype Products. He is well aware about the benefit of this Prototype and will take responsibility to make this equipment as per the project given. He is a very innovative and has great experience of innovation for society’s benefit. His innovate concepts are good and has great potential in R&D sector.  

Abstract:

Natural Disaster is Uninformed, Unpredictable and Uncontrollable problem which destroy all effected area within few second or few time periods. It gives adverse effect to living life, Environment, Pollution and Infrastructure. Informed disaster is also creating the same but in this case we can save life. After the Disaster it is the biggest problem to save life & how to manage with Huge Waste of Building Material, House Hold Waste, Animal Bodies, Crushed Cars & Vehicles, etc. There is no plan or strategy made till date how to handle the Natural Disaster in proper way & quick period of time. Disaster is destroyed everything and create all infrastructure into waste. There is no plan to handle it. No Plan to transfer it. No plan to how to use it again. Waste is also not segregated so it is not possible to use in common way. River water if includes in Disaster then the position goes worse to worse in handling time. It creates lot of disease with in short period. Drinking water will stand the biggest problem and storage area goes very far from the Disaster site. Sometime lot of robbers stole precious items from destroyed properties and from Death bodies also. Local People play a very important role for Disaster management and then Waste Management. Local Authorities comes at second place who take first responsibility to copup from the Problem and safe life as much as can. Waste Management also goes on these shoulders only they has to have sweep clean the Disaster site and make life comfortable as before.

Dande K G

M.B. College, India

Title: Studies on Recent Techniques in Detection of Adulterants In Milk

Time : 18:10-18:30

Speaker
Biography:

Dande K G for being active and dynamic personality in the education and research areas for over three decades and regularly consults Livestock farm owners for establishment and management of Livestock based on Modern Techniques. His feed formulations saved Life of thousands of Livestock during scarcity in the Jurisdiction of Maharashtra. He has earned his M. Sc. (Agri ) in Animal Husbandry and Dairying in 1982, M. Phil in Zoology (1997) and Ph.D. in Dairy Science in 2012. Presently, he is working as Associate Professor Head, Deptt. of Dairy Science. His research areas include Livestock Nutrition and Management, Dairy Science, Histological, Histochemical and Epidemiological studies in arthopod insets and Parasites. He is Ex- Honorary Animal welfare officer, Animal welfare Board of India, Ministry of Environment and forest, Govt of India. He was member of Academic Council and member and / or Chairman Board of studies in Dairy Science SRTM University Nanded. He is a frequent reviewer of National, International, Indexed Journals and Published 10 research papers in National & 14 in International Journals till the date. He has attended 41 Conferences, Seminars, workshop etc., in India and abroad and also Presented research articles. He is a Life Member of Animal Nutrition Society India, Gandhian Studies, He has published several Book on subject related topics Published by National & International Publishers.

Abstract:

Milk is a product of biological origin and can accommodate any additive without apparent changes in its appearance. Milk is the almost perfect food that supplies all necessary nutrients hence its quality needed to be checked for adulteration. In the present investigation milk samples were collected from local dairy farmers (cow and buffalo breed) and analyzed in the laboratory for quality testing specifically adulteration in milk. The received raw milk samples were tested in laboratory for electrical conductivity and refractive index as control (T0) and then adulterated with water, sugar, starch, urea and salt of the concentration as treatment T1 (1%), T2 (2%), T3 (3%), T4 (4%), and T5 (5%), of the milk sample each respectively. The efforts were made to detect adulterants as to render the values of electrical conductivity and refractive index for these adulterants. The existing methods also were used to confirm these adulterants. Lots of test are generally carried out to test the various adulterants hence lots of rupees are also spent. The cost of production can be minimized by testing electrical conductivity and refractive index. If sample showing lower or higher electrical conductivity or refractive index means it is adulterated. Therefore only suspected samples should be separated and tested for specific test. In this way one can save cost of production and time on milk processing. From the present investigation it is concluded that various cow and buffalo breed milk has a specific value of electrical conductivity and refractive index. The electrical conductivity and refractive index of milk get changes when it is adulterated with water, starch, sugar, urea and salt.